Tag: Travel Tips

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How (and Why) to Thank Your Flight's Crew with a Small Gift

December 19, 2014 at 7:23 PM | by | Comments (0)

Congratulations! You've made it through the busiest travel day of the year, but with some 45 million projected to fly on U.S. airlines over the next 19 days, the rush is hardly over.

As a passenger, it's your desire to simply get where you're going with as little stress as possible. It's up the flight's crew, both in front of and behind the cockpit door, who make that wish come true. Show them your appreciation during this holiday season with a small gift, and watch the smiles spread.

Some suggestions:

At the airport

· Starbucks $5 gift cards (or gift cards from other small eateries at the airport)
· A Thank You card, signed by your whole travel party (or, if you're feeling ambitious, the whole plane)
· A travel-themed drawing by your children (here's an example)
· Clear plastic box of Ferrero Rocher chocolates

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Japan is in the Process of Fixing its 'ATM Problem' for Foreigners

Where: Japan
December 18, 2014 at 8:50 AM | by | Comments (0)

In addition to its pricey tendencies, another aspect of Japan has traditionally frustrated foreigners when it comes to money: Many of its local banks and ATMs do not accept international bank cards.

This has been a problem for quite some time, and earlier this year, the country announced that it was going to officially tackle the problem. The Japan Times reported that the Japan Tourism Agency was "urging" the country's banks to accept international cards going forward, perhaps as early as 2015.

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In Search of Perfect Weather: When to Travel to Aruba

December 10, 2014 at 4:45 PM | by | Comments (0)

Google Aruba's average weather and you'll quickly learn two things:

1. Aruba is pretty much an ideal 84 degrees every day, year round.

2. Aruba lies outside the Caribbean hurricane belt.

Both of those statements are music to the years of travelers in the mood for "anywhere sunny, with a beach," but there are reasons outside the weather why you may or may not want to head down to "One Happy Island."

To make sure you book that dream trip and have the best possible time, we've got some recommendations for when to go to Aruba.

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Oh Hey, So the TSA Does Allow Wrapped Gifts (and Pies) on Planes

December 3, 2014 at 11:15 AM | by | Comments (0)


Photo of a pie which successfully passed TSA inspection

Firecrackers? No. Entire roasted turkeys and baked pies? Yes and yes!

The TSA released their 2014 Holiday Travel Tips just ahead of Thanksgiving, but most of the notes best apply to the upcoming rush around Christmas.

For what seems like forever, we've always been told that wrapped gifts are not allowed in luggage because, inevitably, the TSA will have to open them to check their contents. Of course that made no sense considering the use of baggage scanners, but it seemed just one of many outdated security rules still idly enforced.

Cut to the 2014 tips, and the TSA clarifies this issue:

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5 Ways to Spend United MileagePlus Miles and Get More Than a Glass of Wine

December 3, 2014 at 10:10 AM | by | Comments (0)

A few weeks ago, United began trialing a program at Newark Airport. It essentially allowed frequent flyers to redeem those hard-earned MileagePlus miles for food in some restaurants in the terminal. While it might be cool to just swipe your boarding pass and pay from your account, at about 1,000 miles for a glass of wine, the conversion rates aren't the most favorable.

This got us thinking that there are plenty of other United products better worth the miles than an overpriced meal in an overpriced airport restaurant...

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India Finally Launches Visas-on-Arrival for US Travelers

Where: India
December 1, 2014 at 8:30 AM | by | Comments (0)

Almost two months ago, during a visit by the country's Prime Minister to the United States, it was reported that India's visa-on-arrival program would be delayed until the summer of 2015. But last week, as we were enjoying our turkey dinners, India announced that the system was officially up and running for travelers from 43 countries, including the States.

The new program definitely makes entering the country a lot easier for U.S. travelers and is a pretty straighforward process. You apply for the visa online at least four days before your trip and up to 30 days in advance. You will have to upload a photo and pay the $60 fee. When approved, the visa will be sent in an email and is valid for 30 days. Remember that your passport must valid for six months from the dates of travel.

You can find all the information and details online.

[Photo: Flickr]

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The Only 5 Tips You Need for Stress-Free Thanksgiving Travel

November 24, 2014 at 10:12 AM | by | Comments (0)

The Weather Channel's headline of "Wind, Snow, East Coast Storm May Frustrate Fliers and Drivers" isn't what travelers want to read before heading out for a stressful holiday trip. And yet that's exactly what much of the United States will do this week for the Thanksgiving holiday.

To prevent entering the five emotional stages of a flight delay, and keep your cool so you reach your destination as close to on-time as possible, take our tried and true airport survival tips to heart:

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The Lowdown on Getting Around Burma by Taxi

Where: Myanmar
November 21, 2014 at 1:39 PM | by | Comments (0)

It seems like everyone and their moms are going to Burma. Or is it Myanmar? (For the answer, see here.) Thanks to political and humanitarian reforms of the last several years, this Southeast Asian country is more open than ever to tourism. Over the next week or so, Jaunted's Julia Buckley will be sharing her tips and experiences as a traveler in Burma without a tour group and without memorizing a guidebook, but with common sense and open eyes on a Burma Field Trip.

This week in Burma we’ve been concentrating on how to get around, and while it’s the most expensive (and bourgeois) option, hiring a taxi or a private driver is certainly the easiest. It’s also more affordable than you might imagine.

Private cars are good for longer journeys, obviously, but they’re also the best way to spend a day sightseeing. You may (as we were) be expecting Burma to be a land of tuktuks; it isn’t. And Burmese cities are big, with the main sights spread all over the place. If you’re looking for a day of sightseeing, your best option is to hire a driver (motorcycles could be another option—we were offered one in Mandalay—but it’s pretty hot, so you’ll almost certainly want a car).

We found rates varied by city, and also by driver (we were told $50-80 was the going rate in Yangon, for example our driver quoted $50). Also, you’ll be pleased to know, the vast majority of people aren’t out to fleece you; we only had one driver, in a pickup truck in Bagan, who tried to overcharge us. Everyone else was entirely reasonable.

Here’s a list of rough rates we found, as well as drivers we recommend. This doesn’t mean they’re the only reliable drivers, of course – but we met all these, they had good cars, and they themselves were great.

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How to Travel by Train in Burma (If You Must)

Where: Myanmar
November 19, 2014 at 6:15 PM | by | Comments (0)

A typical view

It seems like everyone and their moms are going to Burma. Or is it Myanmar? (For the answer, see here.) Thanks to political and humanitarian reforms of the last several years, this Southeast Asian country is more open than ever to tourism. Over the next week or so, Jaunted's Julia Buckley will be sharing her tips and experiences as a traveler in Burma without a tour group and without memorizing a guidebook, but with common sense and open eyes on a Burma Field Trip.

Yesterday we talked about how to get around Burma. You may have already decided, as so many people have done before you, that flying internally in Myanmar is dangerous, but the overnight train is intrepid and romantic.

You would be wrong.

Certain sections of the internet are aglow with fond accounts of train travel in Burma. It’s the only way to travel like a local, they say. Making the 16hr journey to Mandalay is the way to see the country and its people. Sure, it rocks and rolls a bit, on its tiny ancient narrow gauge railway, but that’s part of the fun.

They’re right on the first two. They’re wrong on the second. It doesn’t just rock and roll. It lurches, which isn’t so bad, it shrieks and screeches, which is atmospheric, but then it jumps. As in, actually jumps off the rails and bounces around. If you’re in a seat, then it’s just incredibly, worryingly painful. But if you’re in a sleeper—which most tourists are advised to take—you will find yourself, no exaggeration, airborne.

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What to Eat in Vienna: 19 Foods That'll Rock Your World

Where: Vienna, Austria
November 19, 2014 at 1:06 PM | by | Comments (0)

Vienna is so much more than Schnitzel.

It's also more than opera, Mozart, Empress Sisi, and Edelweiss on a mountainside. Vienna, Austria is a world capital of good eating, a fact that doesn't get nearly enough play. We'd almost rank it above Paris in terms of excellent culinary adventures, and we simply cannot narrow down our favorite Viennese flavors to a list of 5 or 10 items; nope, we have 19 must-try Vienna food and drinks to share with you.

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From Unknown Airlines to Rickety Trains: How to Get Around Burma

Where: Myanmar
November 18, 2014 at 1:28 PM | by | Comments (0)

It seems like everyone and their moms are going to Burma. Or is it Myanmar? (For the answer, see here.) Thanks to political and humanitarian reforms of the last several years, this Southeast Asian country is more open than ever to tourism. Over the next week or so, Jaunted's Julia Buckley will be sharing her tips and experiences as a traveler in Burma without a tour group and without memorizing a guidebook, but with common sense and open eyes on a Burma Field Trip.

So you’ve debunked your myths, got your e-visa and you’re ready to go to Burma. Great! What’s next?

Working out how to get around.

This is a pain. Burma is a big country, much bigger than you thought. Most people fly into Yangon/Rangoon RGN Airport, and, from there, visit the temples of Bagan, Lake Inle and (if they have time) Mandalay. But Yangon to Bagan is 400 miles. Bagan to Inle is a mountainous 250 miles. Which doesn’t sound much, but it takes forever. Yangon to Bagan 8-9 hours, for example, and that’s in a taxi.

Luckily, there are several ways of traveling in Myanmar. Which should you pick?

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The 101 on Travel to Burma: 10 Myanmar Myths Debunked

Where: Myanmar
November 17, 2014 at 1:32 PM | by | Comment (1)

It seems like everyone and their moms are going to Burma. Or is it Myanmar? Thanks to political and humanitarian reforms of the last several years, this Southeast Asian country is more open than ever to tourism. Over the next week or so, Jaunted's Julia Buckley will be sharing her tips and experiences as a traveler in Burma without a tour group and without memorizing a guidebook, but with common sense and open eyes on a Burma Field Trip.

Every tourist arriving in Burma for the first time does so with their head full of expectations, stereotypes, or misconceptions (or all three). Much of the common intelligence on travel in the country is sadly out of date or simply not true. It's time to explode some myths; here's the Jaunted 101 on travel myths in Burma.

“It's Myanmar, not Burma.”

False. Most people assume that Burma is the colonial name and Myanmar is therefore right-on. But it’s not that easy. ”Myanmar” was coined in 1988 after pro-democracy movements ended in bloodshed, so pro-democracy people, like Aung San Suu Kyi, prefer Burma. The US and UK governments say Burma – ditto Rangoon instead of Yangon. Having said that, once you’re there, and all the locals are calling it Myanmar, it seems disrespectful not to. Basically – make your own mind up or, as we do, vacillate.

“Getting a visa is a headache.”

False. An e-visa costs $50, you do everything online, with no need to surrender your passport, and it takes no time to arrive (mine came in two days, they promise within a week). Apply here. What’s more, you can now enter via Mandalay and Nay Pyi Taw airports, as well as Yangon, with the e-visa.

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