Tag: Travel Health

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What's Up with All the Red Teeth in Papua New Guinea?

December 2, 2014 at 10:35 AM | by | Comments (0)

After you arrive in Papua New Guinea, it won't be long until you notice that everyone's teeth are red and black. It's not the most appealing or fashionable look, but it is the reality and aftermath of chewing betel nut, a habit along the same lines of chewing tobacco or "dipping" in Western culture.

Betel nut, properly known as the areca nut, is found across many parts of the tropical East, including Asia. The exact process of chewing it varies from place to place. In parts of Southeast Asia, the nut is wrapped in a leaf and mixed with tobacco. The process in Papua New Guinea is a little different, where the nut is combined with ground lime and a bean-like mustard stalk.

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'I Flew 9,500 Miles and Did Not Catch Ebola'

October 20, 2014 at 4:34 PM | by | Comments (4)

In the midst of the "Ebola in America" panic, Jaunted's editor flew around the world and has this to say for her experience:

In the course of about 30 hours last week, I flew through 5 major international airports and did not catch Ebola. I flew in Economy, surrounded by other passengers, for four of the five segments, and did not catch Ebola.

The routing: Hong Kong - Los Angeles (LAX) - Las Vegas - Dallas (DFW) - Detroit

Between Dallas and Detroit I used upgrade credits to go from the back of the plane to the front, for the perks of a little extra recline and a hot meal after a long day of travel. People onboard each flight coughed, sneezed, ate snacks, drank beverages, used the restroom, and snored. I did not wear a face mask, I didn't use antibacterial lotion (like Purell) any more than normal, I did spend one night sleeping on the floor at Las Vegas Airport, and yet I did not catch Ebola.

To reiterate: I flew 9500 miles and did not catch Ebola, nor did I ever fear I would, despite being unaware of my seatmate's travel itineraries and health levels. I am going to fly just as intensely next week as well, and I do not fear contracting Ebola on that journey either.

If you're traveling soon (to anywhere except Western Africa) and are even the littlest bit worried, we highly recommend having a read of this Vox.com article, "Can you get Ebola on a plane?"

[Image: Great Circle Map]

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How One Airplane Got Wrapped Up in the US Ebola Panic

October 15, 2014 at 5:28 PM | by | Comments (0)

Turn on the TV this week and there's one word you can't go very long without hearing: Ebola.

While the crisis in Africa is still very much that, a crisis, the US has heard more about a single flight than anything else this week. So here are the facts.

On Monday, October 13, Frontier flight 1143 traveled from Cleveland-CLE to Dallas-DFW Airport. The plane was N220FR, a Frontier Airbus A320 ("Finn the Tiger Shark") and one passenger was a nurse who had previously treated Thomas Eric Duncan, who later died. The plane went on to fly four more flights until the connection between the nurse and the plane was made, at which time the plane was removed from service for cleaning.

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The Ebola Joke Idiot Set a Needed Example for Other Jokesters

October 10, 2014 at 8:00 AM | by | Comments (0)

By now you've likely already heard about the idiot who, while onboard a US Airways flight to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, sneezed and claimed that he possibly had Ebola since he'd recently been in Africa. Of course his remark was a joke, but it was treated quite seriously by other passengers and the flight crew, and medical officers in containment suits removed him from the plane after arrival for evaluation.

Of course his flippant attitude about the very serious issue of Ebola crossing borders via air travel is wrong, and of course his actions were beyond foolish, but the incident has some positive aspects as well.

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Guys, Don't Let Manliness Get in the Way of a Good Travel Massage

June 5, 2014 at 12:57 PM | by | Comments (0)

Okay, big confession coming: Before today, this male travel writer always, always requested a female masseuse. Nine times out of ten, my scheduled therapist was female anyway, but on the rare chance I showed up and it was a man, I’d politely ask if there was a female that could take care of me.

Each and every time, the male masseuse was understanding, and made the switch right away. It’s clear they know the deal. For centuries, heterosexual men have had this thing about being touched by another man, something that simply doesn’t exist for heterosexual women. In 1991, this phobia was humorously captured by our good friends at Seinfeld, and it remains part of our culture today.

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What It Means for SWISS to Be the First 'Allergy-Friendly Airline'

April 22, 2014 at 9:23 AM | by | Comments (0)

This news comes Just in time for allergy season, as there's one airline doing its best to keep passengers from sneezing and sniffling. SWISS just became the first carrier to be classified as allergy-friendly, but just don’t expect them to be busting out HEPA filters between flights.

Basically they’re adding a few new features to both their goodies on the ground and up in the air, as they’re trying their best to help those suffering from allergies when and where they can. Partnering with the European Centre for Allergy Research Foundation will help SWISS to decide what allergy-free means for in-flight service, although the first moves seem to be the addition of lactose- and gluten-free food and beverage options on the in-flight menu. Alternative coffee creamer and a different chocolate bar will be just a couple of the new options, yum.

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Review: Do Travel Socks Really Help Leg Fatigue?

March 14, 2014 at 10:46 AM | by | Comments (0)

About two years ago when traveling to Mexico, this contributor met a man in a long line at customs. When I mentioned I was a travel writer, he began telling me about a new business he was entering: Compression socks.

Compression socks, right. Sounds riveting. What's next? You're going to tell me how much fun it is to be an accountant? He laughed as if he'd heard it before. He looked down at my feet, and told me, all kidding aside, that he thought they’d be good for me with all the travel I do. He said he’d send me a pair once the company was up and running. We went our separate ways, but a few months later, I got a box in the mail.

According to the literature on the box, Dr. Segal’s True Graduated Compression Socks are said to increase circulation and reduce swelling and leg fatigue. A little bit of research shows that the general benefit of compression socks is all science at this point (regardless of the brand), but I was skeptical that they would make much of a notable impact for a young guy like me. Like a good little journalist, I gave them a shot on my next cross-country flight to find out.

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Forget Everything Else. This is How to Combat Jet Lag.

March 6, 2014 at 5:20 PM | by | Comment (1)

Jet lag is one of things where you're always thinking, "hey, this can't happen to me." And then everything is hunky-dory until you step off the plane, have an hour's burst of energy, and then promptly sink into drowsy uselessness for two or three days. Simply put, jet lag is the worst and there are far too many travel tips out there offering pat-on-the-back prevention suggestions.

Personally, we don't have the time and patience for the most popular jet lag-busting recommendation, which is to schedule sleep in advance and transition into new time zones before even leaving. Instead, we stick by three hard and fast tools for minimizing jet lag as best as possible:

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The Two Products Every Traveler Needs in a Toiletry Kit During Winter Weather

February 13, 2014 at 10:40 AM | by | Comments (0)

This winter has been a rough one for the northern hemisphere, with harsh winter conditions in the US and the dreariest of rainy seasons in Europe. Unfortunately the winter isn't over yet, so we're here to drop one big tip that's been a huge help to us as we travel during less than lovely weather: take care of your lips.

Frequent flying and the stress of switching time zones means lots of moisturizing to keep skin fresh and hydrated. It's just that we often overlook the importance of lips. Male or female, it doesn't matter. You need to have these two products in your toiletry kit:

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What's Your Pick for 'Germiest' Tourist Trap?

September 30, 2013 at 12:36 PM | by | Comments (2)

When it comes to travel listings we’re all about things like the most beautiful, most stunning, or most wonderful. However, we have to take a moment to recognize some of the more—uh—unique options, and today we’re taking a look at some of the world’s most germy attractions.

The folks over at TripAdvisor have taken a trip around the globe, and they’ve created their top five when it comes to icky and germy tourist traps. Up first is the Blarney Stone over in Ireland where everyone and their brother just has to lean awkwardly and place a kiss on a really old rock. It’s estimated that like 400,000 or more pairs of lips find their way onto the stone each and every year, so be sure to bring along that TSA approved bottle of Purell.

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Oahu Bans Smoking at the Beach

July 31, 2013 at 6:49 AM | by | Comments (0)

If your idea of rest and relaxation is lounging on the beach, watching the waves, and enjoying a cigarette, your time is running out—at least in Hawaii. The Aloha State is sick and tired of picking up discarded cigarettes and dealing with the smoke at the beach, so the island of Oahu—home of Honolulu and Waikiki—is ready to put up the no smoking signs.

The clean air kicks in on the first of the year, so there’s still some time for smokers to get in one last puff. Smoking will be banned at spots across the island including pools, tennis courts, parks, and beaches. Even if you walk into the water in hopes of smoking—nope—apparently that’s not allowed either, so it’s the rules don’t just stop at the sand.

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Visiting the Birthplace of Modern Medicine on the Greek Island of Kos

Where: Kos, Greece
July 9, 2013 at 10:17 AM | by | Comments (0)

We gave you five reasons why you should suck it up and go on a Greek Islands cruise, and now allow us to add a sixth: You can actually visit the birthplace of modern medicine, where Hippocrates performed his infamous research at the Askleipion on Kos.

Today, there is a bit of doubt about whether Hippocrates actually wrote the medical pledge that is referred to as the Hippocratic Oath. In fact, there’s a lot of skepticism surrounding the sixty or so medical writings that have survived and bear his name. But regardless of whether the documents were written by he or one of his students, it is certain that he was the lead medical researcher of the 5th century B.C., and that his life’s work had a great effect on the practice of medicine, both then and now.

One of the first things you'll notice upon your arrival is that, while Hippocrates might have been the first to discover that diseases were natural and not caused by the Gods, he truly believed that morale was a huge part of the recovery and healing process. Why? Well, just look at the photos above and below, taken from the top of the ruins. You'd feel better, too, if all hospitals had that kind of scenery!

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