Tag: Travel Books

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A Captain and a Cartoonist: Pilot Turns His Sketches Into a Book

July 31, 2014 at 1:05 PM | by | Comments (0)

While we know commercial airline pilots are real people with thoughts and feelings (usually), we passengers rarely get even the slightest glimpse into the other side of the flight deck door.

Commercial airline pilot of 28 years, Chris Manno, has flipped this with the release of Flight Crew. . .like you, a collection of illustrations showcasing the behind-the-scenes view of a career pilot.

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Help Fund a New Travel Guide Dedicated to 101 Places in Pop Culture

May 1, 2014 at 3:24 PM | by | Comments (0)

Have you ever wondered how to be a seat filler at the Oscars, join the paparazzi at Sundance, become a movie extra, volunteer at the Tribeca Film Festival, or help set up the halftime stage at the Super Bowl?

A new travel guide, 101 Places Every Pop Culture Fan Should See, seeks to explain all this, plus 96 other things all media enthusiasts should experience at least once in their lives and, hopefully, on their travels. The book will include information about comic-cons, awards ceremonies, annual parties, film festivals, famous filming locations, and celebrity hang-outs all across the U.S. and Canada.

To get the guide into fans' hands fast, the author has teamed up with a new crowd-driven publishing platform, Inkshares, in order to raise enough money to cover the cost of production. There's only about $3,000 to raise towards the goal.

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Travel Book Suggestion: 'Overbooked' Reveals Dark Side of Travel Industry

March 5, 2014 at 1:18 PM | by | Comments (0)

Travel is so damn exciting that it can often blind us to the harsh realities it bestows on both global and local levels. While we certainly believe in the positive that results from travel in terms of personal gain for individuals and, to a point, monetary gain for destinations, no one should be ignorant to the major political and economical agendas that surround the world of travel and the impact it has on communities within countries. In her book Overbooked: The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism, Elizabeth Becker investigates the effects of the world's top industry, both positive and negative, but mostly focusing on the latter.

Through personal experiences and interviews, she sheds light on topics ranging from the detrimental effects the cruise industry has on the environment and how it has ruined the authenticity in cities (and how they get away with it through political loopholes) to the booming segment of Chinese travelers that will essentially determine the future of tourism. She takes a hard look at some of the world's leading countries in terms of tourism, analyzing what they're doing right and what has gone wrong, including how France has remained an example to follow and how much trouble Africa has had preserving its natural parks.

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Does Anybody Care About '1,000 Places to See Before You Die' Anymore?

January 15, 2014 at 10:48 AM | by | Comments (0)

Every so often, a traveler needs to have a good rant. Here, Jaunted Editor Cynthia shares a few thoughts on an old guidebook and its dwindling power.

The book 1,000 Places to See Before You Die was first published in 2003. It was a steamroller of a hit, topping best seller lists (especially around graduation time in the spring) and finding its place on the bookshelves of anyone who’d listed “travel” as one of their interests.

I was a bookseller at the time, enjoying steady employment after a year of wandering Europe “on a shoestring," and getting that book into shopping bags was something of my specialty. Indeed I was suited for the job, having racked up postcard moments at nearly 100 of those 1,000 sites.

Ten years later, what has changed? The book is still for sale, now ranked #95,806 on Amazon. My area of expertise remains the sharing of travel information, although you’re getting it for free now. A shift has come, alas, in the way travelers compile bucket lists.

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Awesome New Coffee Table Book Details the Last Days of a Dying Airline

August 20, 2013 at 3:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

Just when you think you've amassed enough coffeetable books to do away with the actual table, along comes another title to entice.

It was only earlier this year we shared our discovery of 800 Views of Airports with you, but while that tome focused on bustling tarmacs and busy-bee ground crews, a new photography monograph explores the opposite vibeקthat of an airline with no flying planes, no paying passengers, and little hope.

Wired has an inside look at the book by photographer Nick Ballon, who spent months with unfettered access to the mothballed offices and remaining staff of L.A.B. Lloyd Aereo Boliviano at Jorge Wilstermann Airport in Cochabamba. He titled the photo book, "Ezekiel 36:36," the name of L.A.B.'s last operating plane, which touched down for the final time in 2007.

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Awesome New Coffee Table Book: '800 Views of Airports'

January 8, 2013 at 1:14 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's a little too late to make any holiday wish lists, but the new photo book 800 Views of Airports belongs on your coffee table if you're reading this.

It's a glossy tome of 408 pages, all presenting the photography work of Swiss duo Peter Fischli & David Weiss who, for more than 25 years, snapped photos of the airports wrapped up in their travels. Plane spotters before "plane spotters" was a term, Fischli & Weiss often focus on the long-haul aircraft but also turn their lens towards the tarmac activities of ground support vehicles and orange-vested airport employees.

The official publisher description gets a bit flowery: "Whether presenting a Lufthansa airplane sitting idle in a yellowy light, a Swiss Air plane waiting in a neon-haunted dusk or an Air France plane getting its belly filled in the dead of night, Fischli and Weiss's images present the evanescence of any national identity when reduced to a symbol on a vertical stabilizer."

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Finnair Flight Crew Flip the Pages of Their Own Storybook

Where: Finland
October 5, 2012 at 4:37 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's not often that an airline comes out with its own book; actually, it's been damned rare since Pan Am ended production of their regional and world guidebooks. Still, it does happen and one such instance is now, with Finnair's publication of Airborne: Tales from A Thousand and One Flights [in Finnish, the title is Taivas mikä työpaikka].

The book, a 256-page collection of flight crew stories, was conceived of and written by Finnair's own people. The stories themselves are short and often with a quip, making for light and quick reading. Here's one such story we nipped off its site:

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Some Reads for the Road, to Celebrate World Book Day

March 1, 2012 at 2:06 PM | by | Comments (0)


Or there's always Tintin!

Today, March 1st 2012, is World Book Day. While you'll still get a chance to hit the library or overbuy novels at your local bookstore in May for National Book Day, we wanted to chime in with a few recommendations for early spring.

Classics:

Italian Hours by Henry James
Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Roughing It by Mark Twain
Anything by Freya Stark

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Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen to Make a 'Portlandia' Travel Guidebook

February 14, 2012 at 1:00 PM | by | Comment (1)

IFC's hit series Portlandia has been showing us around Portland's neighborhoods for two seasons, and now they are bringing that expertise to bookstores.

Hachette imprint Grand Central Publishing will release “PORTLANDIA: A Guide for Visitors” later this year. The book will be written like a traditional travel guide, but instead of providing practical information, like prices or reviews, it will take readers on a tour of Portland's landmarks, shops, and restaurants in the same quirky tone Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen use on their sketch comedy show.

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Last-Minute Gift Idea: Wonderful, Out of Date Travel Advice

December 23, 2011 at 11:59 AM | by | Comments (0)

Still scrambling for a last-minute gift for your sister/baby-sitter/party hostess/globe-trotting cousin/self? If the person in question loves to travel, pop down to your local bookshop (you know, if you still have one) and ask for a copy of this little gem: Hints to Lady Travellers At Home and Abroad.

Never mind that this all-encompassing travel 'how to' was published in 1889; the advice dispensed by Ms. Lillias Campbell Davidson within proves to be surprisingly prescient. Not to mention entertaining.

The book—reissued this year—is perfectly sized to stuff a stocking or slide into a side pocket of your carry-on. Its bite-sized chapters are organized alphabetically, like so: "Accidents, Apartments, Baths, Boarding-houses, Booking-offices, cabs, cab fares, Cushions..."

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Sipping Coffee with a Side of Lonely Planet; Welcome to Chicago's Kopi Cafe

November 1, 2011 at 3:16 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's perhaps about time we shared a secret with you—the secret of our favorite coffeeshop in Chicago. True northside Chicagoans should know it already, but visitors to the Windy City would likely skip over the cafe—and indeed its entire, awesome neighborhood of Andersonville—completely. You shouldn't do that—you should go to Kopi: A Traveler's Cafe.

Sure, we were originally attracted many years ago by the name "Traveler's Cafe," but Kopi delivers on many levels above and beyond the bookshelf stacked with an okay selection of travel guides. For one, it has a huge menu of coffee drinks (spicy Oregon chai? check. Viennese coffee? check. Thai iced coffee? you know it). It's casual and affordable, and the lack of WiFi means it's not a laptop farm (yet).

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Climb Aboard East London's Book Barge for Lit-Nerd Delights and 'Bibliotherapy'

Where: Regents Canal, London, United Kingdom
July 26, 2011 at 3:52 PM | by | Comments (0)

Bibliophiles who land in London may find themselves beset with disappointment at the sight of many a so-so bookseller, W.H. Smith and Waterstones among the city's prominent chains. But, as we recently reported, the literary-minded city is also rich with independent shops with a penchant for carefully selecting their stock and giving their customers the kind of knowledgeable, personal attention every proper lit-monger demands.

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