Tag: Titanic

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Titanic II Could Actually Become a Reality

January 10, 2013 at 1:28 PM | by | Comments (2)

Some wise guy in Australia with too much money on his hands thinks it is a good idea to relaunch a replica of the world's most famous "unsinkable" ship, Titanic. This sounds like it might be a disaster of, well, Titanic proportions.

The full story: Aussie mining tycoon Clive Palmer has the desire to recreate, in perfect scale and to extreme detail, Titanic II. You see, he owns a shipping line called Blue Star Line and he's doing this entire stunt with the help of his own company. Even the plans to build the replica ship have commenced in Finland and a Chinese ship-building company has been secured. If all goes well, the ship will embark on its maiden voyage sometime in 2016 from Southhampton to New York, serving as the line's flagship vessel.

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Famous Ships That Did Not Sink: The 'SS President Grant'

April 20, 2012 at 11:42 AM | by | Comments (0)

As you already know, this last weekend marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Though yes, the sinking is a huge part of history, it's also not indicative of how ship travel actually was in the early 20th century. Not every ship sank. This week, we'll show you some notable ships that managed to stay afloat and still make their mark in history.

Today's ship that didn't sink: the SS President Grant of Admiral Oriental Line.

Have you picked up on a theme in our series so far? It's that, for all these notable ocean liners that didn't sink, they eventually ended up serving their time as troopships, mostly during World War I. Had the Titanic continued on, she probably would have gone the same route, possibly even eventually sinking from U-boat torpedoes.

Still we focus on one more ship that didn't sink, and this one isn't a veteran of the transatlantic route; the SS President Grant instead plied the waves between the US west coast and the Orient, specifically Japan and Hong Kong. As the Grant, the ship sailed for weeks with passengers bound for new lives, or just new adventures, on the other side of the world. As the USS Harris, which is what she became in 1940 with a conversion to a US troopship, she sailed with troops fighting World War II in the South Pacific, in North Africa, and even in the Aleutian Islands.

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Famous Ships That Did Not Sink: The 'RMS Queen Mary'

April 18, 2012 at 11:15 AM | by | Comments (0)

As you already know, this last weekend marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Though yes, the sinking is a huge part of history, it's also not indicative of how ship travel actually was in the early 20th century. Not every ship sank. This week, we'll show you some notable ships that managed to stay afloat and still make their mark in history.

Today's ship that didn't sink: the RMS Queen Mary of Cunard Line.

Let's consider something a moment. When the 100th Anniversary of the Titanic sinking rolled around last week, it became apparent that the younger generations were filled with kids who though the Titanic was a fictional tale made up for the James Cameron movie. It was only the news coverage of the anniversary that made them realize that—whoops, hey—over 1,000 did actually die when a real ship hit a real iceberg and really sank.

Now think about the fact that a transatlantic liner of the same style, though much younger, is currently still afloat as a hotel, museum and event space in Long Beach, California. This ship is the Queen Mary and she's not a stage set or a fauxboat; she's a real ship with a really impressive history and, lucky for her, a real future still afloat.

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Famous Ships That Did Not Sink: The 'SS Kaiser Wilhelm II'

April 17, 2012 at 12:37 PM | by | Comments (0)

As you already know, this last weekend marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Though yes, the sinking is a huge part of history, it's also not indicative of how ship travel actually was in the early 20th century. Not every ship sank. This week, we'll show you some notable ships that managed to stay afloat and still make their mark in history.

Today's ship that didn't sink: Kaiser Wilhelm II of Norddeutscher Lloyd line.

Back in the day, Norddeutscher Lloyd had it going on. Steamships, mail ships, luxurious transatlantic liners...they had them all. That is, they had them all until World War I broke out and many of those hulls found themselves docked in the wrong parts of the world. Such was the story of yesterday's featured ship, the Kronprinz Wilhelm. Today we continue with one its sister ships, Kaiser Wilhelm II, which first fired up the boilers in 1903 and used them to their limit to earn the Blue Riband in 1904, for fastest eastbound transatlantic crossing only two years after the Kronprinz had done the same.

The Wilhelm II had a quiet life of cruising paying passengers back and forth between Germany and the US, until the latter decided to keep her for good in 1917. She became the Agamemnon, a troopship that pushed thousands of US soldiers into Europe to fight the very people who had built her.

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Famous Ships That Did Not Sink: The 'SS Kronprinz Wilhelm'

April 16, 2012 at 11:33 AM | by | Comments (0)

As you already know, this last weekend marked the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Though yes, the sinking is a huge part of history, it's also not indicative of how ship travel actually was in the early 20th century. Not every ship sank. This week, we'll show you some notable ships that managed to stay afloat and still make their mark in history.

Today's ship that didn't sink: Kronprinz Wilhelm of Norddeutscher Lloyd line.

Look, if you were building an ocean liner in the early 1900s, you had a lot of competition. To stand out, ships aimed to take home titles and prizes, like "longest ship" or "fastest transatlantic crossing." The latter was the real gem, and the prize for being the speediest ship between the UK and US was called the Blue Riband. It's what the Titanic was aiming to claim when it kept its boilers running high and sailing fast through an ice field. Whoops.

Alas, the Kronprinz Wilhelm and her 660' length first set sail in 1901 and took the Blue Riband in 1902 (the Titanic didn't sail and sink until 1912) with a crossing time of 5.5 days. Not too shabby, considering today's cruise ships still schedule a transatlantic "cruise" for a straight week.

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The Titanic Graveyard Isn't in New York or Southampton. It's in Canada.

Where: Halifax, Canada
April 13, 2012 at 12:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

Going to visit the largest burial site of those who died in the Titanic ship disaster while on a cruise probably isn't the best idea, but then you think of something better to do while practically fogged in at Halifax's harbour. We took a bus out to Fairlawn Cemetery, which definitely isn't near downtown Halifax but more on the edge of a regular neighborhood. You'd never guess that inside the modest gates lay 121 victims, some still unidentified 100 years after the ship hit the iceberg and sunk on its maiden transatlantic voyage.

Fairlawn is open during normal daylight hours and, on a typical day, one bus tour will be followed by another bus tour stopping to visit the site. The Titanic portion of the cemetery consists of three rows of graves that mostly match, save for a few whose families purchased individual tombstones for their loved ones. All death dates are the same: April 15, 1912, though the ship hit the iceberg on the 14th.

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You Know, Most Ships in the 1900s Didn't Sink

April 12, 2012 at 5:20 PM | by | Comments (0)

Since nobody has said anything at all yet regarding the imminent 100th Anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, let us remind you that yes—it is this Saturday, April 14.

For just a moment, however, let us also remind you that the Titanic wasn't the only ship to ever ply transatlantic waters, and it wasn't the only one to come to a horrible end. On a positive note, hundreds other luxurious liners didn't sink and didn't hit anything and—gasp—dont' now figure at the center of elementary school history essays.

As proof, we offer this excerpt from a 1903 brochure published by the Norddeutscher Lloyd Steamship Company. At the very center of the brochure, a map unfolds of their current routes. Look how involved in Cuba they were! Galveston, today a cruise port, was a transatlantic port back then! And, if you had many weeks to spare, you could always do the few Pacific crossings. No icebergs there.

Next week we'll go more in depth with this, so stay tuned.

[Image: Jaunted]

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Got $189 Million? Then You've Got 5,500 Artifacts from the Wreck of the 'Titanic'

January 5, 2012 at 4:33 PM | by | Comments (0)


A mug from third class on the Titanic

Anyone got $189 million just chilling in the bank? If your answer is yes, then you've probably also got enough extra space to house some 5,500 artifacts raised from the ocean floor wreck of the RMS Titanic, because all that is about to be auctioned off...in one fell swoop.

That's right; if you want to buy just one piece from the massive collection, you're going to have to buy all of it, since the auction comes complete with a 19-page document of what you can and cannot do with the items. It's mostly cannot do. So there'll be no drinking your morning coffee from a steerage class mug, nor will there be fogging up a porthole with your breath, only to write "J + L = <3" with your finger. You've got to treat these items with respect, just as the salvage company has attempted to do until now:

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In April 2012, All Eyes Will Be Back on the White Star Line's Liverpool Headquarters

July 21, 2011 at 2:53 PM | by | Comments (0)

In April 2012, legions of Titanic buffs will likely descend on Liverpool, England to remember the centennial anniversary of the ship's tragic sinking. Why? Well, the ship didn't sail from Liverpool on her fatal maiden voyage, but Titanic's owner White Star Line was registered there, earning the ship the "Liverpool" painted on her stern as city of registration.

Additionally, most of the ship's crew was from Liverpool, and the White Star building—called Albion House—was home for the company from 1898 through 1927. Its historical, striped facade is something of a tourist site, which has the capability to turn a bit morbid since, according to Wikipedia, "in 1912, when news of the disaster of the Titanic reached the offices, the officials were too afraid to leave the building, and instead read the names of the deceased from the balcony."

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A Visit to the Titanic Graveyard

September 28, 2010 at 12:49 PM | by | Comments (0)

Going to visit the largest burial site of those who died in the Titanic ship disaster while on a cruise probably isn't the best idea, but then you think of something better to do while practically fogged in at Halifax's harbour. We took a bus out to Fairlawn Cemetery, which definitely isn't near downtown Halifax but more on the edge of a regular neighborhood. You'd never guess that inside the modest gates lay 121 victims, some still unidentified almost 100 years after the ship hit the iceberg and sunk on its maiden transatlantic voyage.

Fairlawn is open during normal daylight hours, and on a typical day, one bus tour will be followed by another bus tour stopping to visit the site. The Titanic portion of the cemetery consists of three rows of graves that mostly match, save for a few victims' families who purchased their own tombstones for their loved ones. All death dates are the same: April 15, 1912.

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