Tag: Science Travel

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Europe Joins the 'Vomit Comet' Game as Zero-G Flights Begin

Where: France
March 18, 2013 at 10:24 AM | by | Comments (0)

We’re all about in-flight comfort—from fine wining and dining to the latest in sleeper suites, it's all of interest to us, and of course we want to try it. However, that doesn’t mean that we aren’t interested in something a little more adventurous when climbing aboard an aircraft. That’s why we’re pretty intrigued about the Zero-G flights now available to the paying public over in Europe.

You’ve probably heard of the “Vomit Comet” before, as aircraft flying wild courses to experience reduced gravity is hardly a new concept. Space agencies have been using airplanes for years to simulate varying degrees of weightlessness, but you no longer need to be an astronaut to climb aboard. Trips like this have been available in the United States and Russia, but this is the first time these kinds of flights have been open to one and all in Europe.

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A Visit to Arizona's Barringer Crater, AKA the Best Preserved Meteor Site in the World

March 12, 2013 at 12:06 PM | by | Comments (0)

Know what's cool? Space. Know what's even cooler? When things floating around in the vastness of space come pay a visit to earth. Ok, that's only cool when it happens thousands of years ago and doesn't hurt anyone. Luckily for us, that's exactly what happened near Winslow, Arizona 50,000+ years ago.

Formerly known as "Canyon Diablo Crater," this meteor crater, now known as the "Barringer Crater," is said to be the world's (that's right, world's) first proven and best preserved meteor crater. It's so well preserved that NASA used it in the '60s to train astronauts preparing for Apollo missions to Earth's moon. They did this because the crater very closely matches those found on the moon.

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Can Jet Lag Be Cured by a Scientific Shower?

March 4, 2013 at 9:32 AM | by | Comments (0)

We thought Delta was hard at work adding plenty of those Economy Comfort seats as well as WiFi on each and every flight, but apparently they also have a little extra time to work on some other projects. They’re actually trying to solve the problem of jet lag, and they just showed off some of their most recent ideas at the Technology, Entertainment and Design—TED—conference out in Long Beach, California.

This stuff might be a little bit above our pay grade when it comes to understanding the science behind things, but basically what Delta has created is some kind of light shower. Photon light rains down upon you, and then like magic you’re cured from any and all jetlag—at least in theory.

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Russia Meteor Tourism Now Becoming a Thing

March 1, 2013 at 2:50 PM | by | Comments (0)

A Russian region once shunned as the site of the world's third-worst-ever nuclear disaster, in which hundreds of people were killed, has now become a potential tourist destination because it was hit by a giant space rock that injured thousands of additional people. The local tourism board is actually talking about making parts of the territory into a "Meteor Disneyland," a reference to last month's Russian meteor.

That's it.

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How to Get Tickets to Watch the SpaceX Rocket Blast Off from Kennedy Space Center

February 22, 2013 at 11:44 AM | by | Comments (0)

So they’re not exactly launching any space shuttles out of Florida anytime soon, but the Kennedy Space Center is still plenty busy these days. In fact they’ve got so much going on that they’d love to have you swing by and check things out for yourself.

The next piece of space stuff departing earth is the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, and if things stay on schedule—and the weather cooperates—it’ll blast off on Friday, March 1. Those heading over to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex can score a front row seat for the event, with viewing right along the NASA Causeway.

If you’re looking to set a reminder on your phone, it’s all scheduled to go down up at 10:10am EST from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

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Thank You, Science: In-Flight Farts are Totally Fine

February 20, 2013 at 10:39 AM | by | Comments (0)

We always try to rise above and be mature adults, but sometimes we just can’t avoid reverting to our 12-year old mindset—especially when it comes to fart jokes. Usually bathroom humor isn’t something that makes its way into the travel news, but apparently scientists have been hard at work studying airplane flatulence while we’ve been writing about stuff like in-flight WiFi and airplane paint jobs. Now that the research has been completed and the data has been analyzed, it looks like letting one rip at 35,000-feet is actually encouraged—at least according to science.

Thanks to the scholarly journalists over at the New York Daily News, we learned about the findings arriving out of New Zealand. It sounds like the air pressure up in the air causes all kinds of side effects including an increase in gas; however, trying to maintain one’s best behavior keeps that gas inside most passengers. In an article entitled Flatulence on airplanes: just let it go scientists think that we should just let our bodily functions prevail, and they’re actually—at least somewhat—encouraging passengers and pilots to participate in mile-high farts.

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Russia's Meteor is Nothing Compared to Arizona's Hole in the Ground

February 18, 2013 at 3:42 PM | by | Comments (0)

That meteor doing its thing over—and into—Russia was kind of neat in a crazy kind of way, huh? Still, we’re pretty sure that we’d prefer that the space rocks stay out of the atmosphere for a bit. However, it's totally possible to check out some of the space stuff that’s made its way down to earth already, which is why we were intrigued to learn about one museum where you can safely check out some astronomical debris.

The best preserved meteorite impact site in the whole world is just outside Winslow, Arizona. The one mile across, 550-foot deep crater is yours for the checking out, as the site and museum are open between 8am and 5pm daily. It’s not just a huge hole in the ground—although it is that first and foremost—as they’ve got hunks of space junk on display as well. There’s a meteorite fragment that weighs a cool 1,400 pounds, and there’s plenty of space this and astronaut that. They’ve even got some training items on display from the Apollo space missions.

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Where Bill Gates Vacations (The Answer May Shock You)

February 12, 2013 at 3:04 PM | by | Comments (0)

Where do brainy billionaires vacation? Oh, just garbage dumps...or missile silos, if we're talking about brainy billionaire Bill Gates.

Thanks to the question-and-answer period known as an "AMA" (Ask Me Anything) on Reddit, we now know where to find Mr. Gates relaxing during his off hours—that is, if anyone but Mr. Gates has access to these places. Here's what happened: Bill was asked, "What would be your definition of a chill and fun day?" He replied in a broad sense, taking it to mean hobbies and vacation.

I love playing tennis. I am an avid bridge player (a card game if you have not heard of it - it was more popular in the past!). I like to tour interesting things with my kids like power plants, garbage dumps, the Large Hadron Collider, Antarctica, missile Silos (Arizona),... I read a lot and watch courses (online or the Learning Company)..

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So You Want to Spot the Northern Lights This Winter.

Where: Finland
November 9, 2012 at 7:16 PM | by | Comment (1)

It's that time of the year again, when Scandinavia touts its reindeer meat and hotels made of ice. Luckily they've got a few other good qualities to keep attracting tourists even in the depths of dark winter...like the Aurora Borealis!

We may have previously told you about viewing the phenomenon from a plane, and Finnair knows that their flights are the best for Northern Lights-spotting. That's why they not only wrote a giant blog post about how the Finns sometimes take it for granted, but they're reminding travelers what side of the plane to sit on for the best viewing (hint: whichever side will face north).

Some other Aurora Borealis tips from Finnair:

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Where and When to Watch the Space Shuttle Atlantis Make a Final Move

October 23, 2012 at 11:30 AM | by | Comments (0)

If you missed the move of the Space Shuttles to their new homes in New York City and Los Angeles—don’t worry—there’s still one more NASA orbiter that has yet to reach its final resting place This time the transportation is taking place in Florida and not too far from where the astronauts and crew did their thing for decades. That means that there will be no piggyback-plane flyover, but at least you’ll have the chance to pay your respects to one of the country’s remnants of NASA space travel technology.

This time it’s the Space Shuttle Atlantis, and it's scheduled to head over to Kennedy Space Center on November 2. It only needs to travel around 10 miles or so to park and ready a new $100 million exhibit, but much of the path is through restricted areas and other limited access places.

That means you’re going to need to buy your way along the route and the Kennedy Space Center visitor complex will be happy to sell you some tickets for exactly that.

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Thank NASA Astronauts for the Eventual End of Airsickness

October 17, 2012 at 12:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

NASA has always been very eager to showcase "practical" space travel spin-offs. Voters have generally been reluctant to fund the space agency merely because it takes humanity into the stars and builds telescopes that peek into the origins of the universe—even the Apollo program had problems getting support at the time—so NASA tells people that space technology will also help scientists build better toasters or whatever. It's actually kind of depressing.

That said, and luckily, people who can land bus-sized rovers on other planets with tick-tock precision are obviously going to create some really cool stuff. And since it's already there, why not spin it off?

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Scientists Closer Than Ever to Figuring Out When Volcanoes Will Ruin Your Vacation

October 15, 2012 at 2:01 PM | by | Comments (0)

We live in a travel world where, for better or worse, Jaunted maintains categories for volcanoes and for volcano travel, to say nothing of our originally lighthearted but eventually kind of depressing big ash problems tag. Every January we wait the first eruption-driven airline cancellations of year. On particularly bad years we've even been known to slip into theological spculation about which gods exactly travelers pissed off.

Aside from angering volcano deities, there are also more mundane explanations for why travelers, every year, get stuck in airports because of volcanoes. A lot of those reasons have as much to do with badly planned and implemented safety regulations as they do with actual eruptions. But as those bad regulations get get fixed and as new technology comes online, we're getting to the point where we just have to admit that sometimes volcanoes erupt, and sometimes that delays air travel, and sometimes there's nothing anyone can do about it.

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