Tag: Politics Travel

View All Tags

/ / / / / /

TSA Hasn't Quite Figured Out If Its Machines Are Actually Working

May 14, 2015 at 4:00 PM | by | Comments (0)

TSA has contracts totalling $1.2 billion with four different companies to maintain its machines. Last year it spent about $251 million making sure its super-irritating scanners and its somewhat-less-irritating bomb detectors were at least working. Maintenance seems like a reasonable thing to do, and is the minimum you'd expect in exchange for the hassle that U.S. travelers go through.

Except a new report from the Office of Inspector General has revealed that, oh by the way, officials from TSA have no idea if any of the maintanance work is keeping the machines working. Take the next step, and the logical conclusion is that officials from the travel security agency don't know if the machines themselves are working properly. Because why would they?

Why are they so bad at everything?

more ›

/ / / /

TSA Fired Two Groping Screeners, But Won't Tell You Who Or What Or Why Or How

April 24, 2015 at 10:20 AM | by | Comments (0)

The TSA groping scandal seems like it's been going on for a year, but people are still talking about it so it's worth putting on your radar.

The Economist - an outlet that has spent roughly 150 years developing its dry, understated tone - lit up the airport security agency earlier this week, calling it out for "repeated sexual assaults." This is of course in the wake of two TSA agents, a guy and a girl, getting fired for being part of a "pat downs for pleasure" conspiracy.

The scheme was actually kind of clever, albeit staggeringly illegal and guaranteed to detonate whatever trust the public still had in TSA. When the guy saw another guy he wanted to grope heading through a scanner, he would send a signal to his accomplice. The accomplice would then tell the scanner that it was scanning a female. The scanner would look for female body parts and - there's no gentle way to write this - detect a bulge around the groin area that wasn't supposed to be there. It would return an alarm, the traveler would get pulled aside for secondary screening, and then the groping would happen.

more ›

/ / / / / / /

After the NOLA Machete Attack, How Do You Feel About Arming TSA Agents?

March 26, 2015 at 1:20 PM | by | Comment (1)

Last Friday a lunatic - we think it's fair to call him a lunatic - walked into Louis Armstrong International in New Orleans and began trying to hack up the place with a machete.

He used anti-wasp spray to keep security officers at bay, and it would later be discovered that the bag he was carrying was filled with Molotov cocktails. The attacker managed to badly injure a TSA worker before finally being brought down by a sheriff who was in the area.

And therein lies the debate that started on Monday: what would have happened had the armed officer not been there? TSA personnel are trained to handle rampages, and this article describes some of the tactics they used (one guy blocked the machete with a piece of luggage while travelers fled the area). But the only thing that stops an attack like this in its tracks is a well-aimed shot, and TSA agents aren't armed.

more ›

/ / / / / / / /

Another Example of How TSA is Ruining The PreCheck System for Everyone

March 23, 2015 at 3:35 PM | by | Comment (1)

Either the TSA is actively trolling the American people, or these guys actually are so incompetent they could screw up a one car parade.

You guys obviously know about PreCheck and PreCheck lines, and you've probably heard about how some airports send passengers randomly into the PreCheck line to speed things up. The idea is that if you randomly send every 10th or every 20th passenger through expedited screening, what are the odds that the person you randomly selected is actually a terrorist? Want to guess how this turns out?

A new report, published last week by Homeland Security, revealed that the system sent a notorious felon and terrorist through a PreCheck line. This guy was so famous that he was recognized by sight by the officers in the PreCheck line. They alerted their supervisor, who of course ordered the officer to let the terrorist continue on his way. Stellar work from start to finish from America's exquisitely staffed airport security agency.

The TSA's response, by the by, is that it "takes its responsibility for protecting the traveling public very seriously." Feel better?

more ›

/ / / / / / / / / /

'The Most Beautiful Room in Canada' Lifts Ban on Tourist Snapshots

Where: Ottawa, Canada
January 30, 2015 at 6:14 PM | by | Comments (0)

You've just got to see the Library of Parliament, located within the Parliament buildings in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Ranked as one of the "7 Wonder of Canada," but more famously recognized as the "most beautiful room in Canada," the library is the only remaining piece of the original 1876 Parliament building, surviving the destructive 1916 fire thanks to iron fire doors. Inside are 1 million documents and 11 miles of books and, up until very recently, a "no cameras" zone.

Visitors to the Library fall into one of two groups: members of Parliament and their staff, or members of there public making the official (and free!) Parliament tour. The latter would find themselves disappointed by a major rule: photography was strictly prohibited if the room had anyone in it, either staff or politician. Occasionally a weekend tour would get lucky and find an empty library, but viewing the room with all its lights on, a librarian stationed, and in active use brings out the spirit of the space.

more ›

/ / / / /

TSA Has Huge Loophole to Allow Profiling in Airports

December 18, 2014 at 2:17 PM | by | Comments (0)

Here's a feel-good story to ease you into the holidays.

The Obama administration is preparing to issue a new set of guidelines that will for the first time ban national security agencies from conducting profiling based on race, religion, national origin, or sexual orientation. There are already rules going back to 2003 banning racial profiling by most parts of the federal government, but those rules don't apply to national security agencies and don't encompass religion, national origin, or sexual orientation. These new guidelines are aimed at shoring up those oversights.

All well and good, unless you're the TSA, and part of your job is to apply extra scrutiny to people originating in places like Syria and Yemen just in case they're terrorists. In that case you'd be kind of screwed, unless you could get an exemption from the new restrictions. Want to guess how this story ends?

more ›

/ / / / / / /

What the Resumption of US-Cuba Relations Means for Travelers (Besides Cigars)

Where: Cuba
December 17, 2014 at 12:58 PM | by | Comment (1)

It's true. US visitors to Cuba are now allowed to bring $100 worth of Cuban cigars back into the country and it's all thanks to a little speech this morning by President Obama, to announce the resumption of US-Cuba relations for the first time since 1961.

This major development, which will see the reopening of a US embassy in Havana and easing of travel bans, came about thanks to talks orchestrated by Canada and Pope Francis in the Vatican. According to the NY Times, the final step occurred just this morning, when two world leaders picked up the telephone:

more ›

/ / / /

6 Ways You Could Spend the Navy Secretary's $4.7 Million Travel Budget

December 8, 2014 at 10:08 AM | by | Comments (0)

If you haven't heard, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has spent $4.7 million on travel this year so far. The $4.7 million has taken Mabus over 955,000 miles through Iraq, Afghanistan, numerous trips to German military bases, and a few relationship-typing “we-need-to-talk” type of chats Japan and South Korea.

With this, it’s truly difficult to grasp the magnitude of 955,000 travel miles. To quickly put that in perspective, that’s about the distance between Earth and Mars… times four! For fun, we decided to figure out some crazy, cool, and crazy-cool things to do with a $4.7 million and 955,000-mile travel budget.

more ›

/ / / / / /

How to Get a Visa to Visit Papua New Guinea

November 24, 2014 at 2:13 PM | by | Comments (0)

When it comes to new opportunities in tourism, Papua New Guinea might be the latest and greatest travel destination not named Myanmar. The latter’s recent surge is due to, among other political improvements, a complete restructuring of its tourism policies in 2013. In very much the same way, Papua New Guinea, after nearly four decades of struggling to find its footing as an independent country, has slowly been transitioning into a destination foreigners can feel comfortable visiting.

According to its Tourism Authorities, only 5,000 Americans visit PNG each year, putting those who make the journey in an exclusive class of travelers. Despite what you might assume from a generally poor population, the cost of living in Port Moresby is on par with other major cities around the world—think the high rates of New York and Paris—mostly thanks to the influx of foreign mining companies over the past decade, a list that includes Exxon and Mobil.

more ›

/ / / / /

Local News Panics After Discovering Old, Defunct TSA Program

November 13, 2014 at 2:11 PM | by | Comments (0)

Time for another edition of "People are Idiots, and That's Why We Can't Fix TSA." True story.

Many years ago DHS received a Congressional mandate to secure the nation's airports, which the department duly implemented by putting up TSA checkpoints everywhere. Critics of the agency almost immediately began to complain about its uselessness - "security theater" was a popular catchphrases - and some went so far as to accuse TSA of actively conspiring to destroy America.

After a while TSA responded with: "Listen, we can't just shut down inspections because Congress won't let us. How about instead we establish this new PreCheck system, where for only $85 you can pass a background check and breeze through security?"

more ›

/ / / / / / / / / / / /

Step Back in Time to 1970s East Germany at These 5 Berlin Spots

November 11, 2014 at 10:22 AM | by | Comments (0)

Brandenburg Gate. Alexanderplatz. Checkpoint Charlie.

The 25th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall has done more than just shed a brighter light on some of Berlin's best-known tourist sites; it's wholly reignited interest in the brief history of the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik), aka East Germany. Although the DDR technically ceased to exist upon Berlin reunification in 1990 and East Germany feverishly adapted to Western fashion and culture, the particular details of DDR everyday life continue to fascinate.

A handful of Berlin sites continue to preserve DDR design, and anyone is welcome to visit. Here are five of our favorites:

more ›

/ / / / / / / / / / /

Another Day, Another Wave of Airport Ebola Panic

October 30, 2014 at 1:28 PM | by | Comments (0)

Boy this whole Ebola outbreak thing has been a real boon for travel journalism, eh? Nary a day goes by without an airport getting locked down because some nurse has a fever, or a plane getting emptied because some idiot makes a joke about feeling sick, or a state getting quarantined because some politician was psychologically scarred by watching Outbreak on a date in the '90s. We can't remember the last time there were so many stories about airports and airplanes and travel politics. It's really just a delight.

Seriously though, the only thing less fun than having Ebola is watching global commercial aviation try to scramble to deal with Ebola. People are not always very bright.

more ›