Tag: Nature Travel

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Fraser Island Field Trip: Offroading Inland to Secret Creeks and Special Lakes

July 24, 2014 at 10:35 PM | by | Comments (0)

We may have stayed close to the shore yesterday, but now it's time to brave the sand dune tracks and head inland on Australia's Fraser Island. While it's rated as the largest sand island in the world, Fraser is shockingly easy to traverse if you've got the right gear, and we're not just talking low gear. A 4x4 is all you need to reach those corners of the island both so untouched and pristine, you'll think you're the first to ever view them.

It's important to note that there are a handful of lakes on the island worth the trek away from the beaches. Lake McKenize is the most famous, with its crystal blue waters ringed with white sand. McKenzie, Lake Birrabeen and Basin Lake are all perched lakes that depend on rainfall to fill their shores, so the waters are cool and fresh, and begging you to swim. Let's talk about a few of the other inland sites, however:

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Fraser Island Field Trip: Where Life is a Beach AND a Highway

July 23, 2014 at 4:27 PM | by | Comments (0)

No silly sayings or Tom Cochrane references here! Just the fact that Australia's Fraser Island has some pretty cool things to see and do.

While most activities revolve around nature, fresh air, and enjoyment of the outdoors, we couldn't pass up the chance to rent a 4x4 and head onto the Eastern Beaches for the island's most popular activity: speeding up the coast, on the coast. Yep, you've heard correctly; not only is driving on the beach legal, but it's actually encouraged and one of the best ways to see a huge portion of this island off Queensland.

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Wish You Were Here: Fraser Island, Australia

July 21, 2014 at 1:42 PM | by | Comments (0)

We come to you from a small dollop of land off the Eastern coast of Australia by the name of Fraser Island. This World Heritage Site sits about 120 miles north of Brisbane in the Hervey Bay region, and is a haven for some unique flora and fauna, including native dingoes, goanna lizards, and more.

Fraser's biggest claim to fame however, is the fact that it's the world's largest sand island, boasting awesome 4x4ing, meandering nature walks, and an easy tropical escape from the city. At this particular time of year, the island is home to some foreign travelers without the need of passports; we're talking about the massive whale migration from the Southern Pacific to these slightly warmer waters near the equator.

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How Your Next United Flight May Help to Track Endangered Animals

July 9, 2014 at 11:30 AM | by | Comments (0)

Chances are we've all seen a David Attenborough documentary or two, and listened as he discussed how specific animals move, live and act in their natural habitat. The reason this information is known is mostly due to animal tagging and tracking. Basically, putting small GPS sensors onto animals to track their migration and possibly help prevent the endangerment of the species plays an important part in conservation and research.

Now, United will play a new role in this animal tracking with their installation of radio receiver antennas on their aircraft. They'll be able to pick up signals for animal tags while they fly around, which seems like a perfect idea since the airline criss-crosses any part of the planet 5,300 times per day.

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When to Go Whale Watching: The Best Cities and Seasons

May 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM | by | Comments (4)

Even whales prefer to travel in the summer months, and their mass migrations attract larger crowds of human spectators across the globe. From humpbacks to minkes and grays to sperm whales, there's plenty of variety to these giant mammals and plenty more places to spot them in their natural habitat.

In general, right now is the season most whales are on the move, heading to cooler waters to grab a good feed until the temps start to drop again, at which time they head back to warmer water. In the Northern Hemisphere, we're lucky that whale watching season also corresponds with the start of summer travels, but the Southern Hemisphere's winter season might make for a chilly boat ride out to the say "hi" to the gentle giants.

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Travel Snapshot: This Bridge Only Serves an Island's Eight-Legged Residents

May 19, 2014 at 11:40 AM | by | Comments (0)

Traveling around the globe to experience new and exciting places is one tried and true reason to hop on a plane. The resulting numb butt and bloodshot eyes are only a small price to pay to see something you couldn't see in your own backyard, and that's why this travel snapshot is so neat.

We came across the above bridge with little understanding of what it could be, but once we figured it out, the cleverness of its design and function were a "duh" shocker. Before we reveal the full details on where and what this is, here are a few clues:

· The country in which this photo was taken has more crustacean residents (43.7 million-ish) than people (2,100).
· The above overpass has a heavy traffic season right around November-December.
· With about 3 flights per week, this destination is not easy to reach but completely worth the trouble.
· Although very tropical, this location is a far departure from cocktails and infinity pools.

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Plug In and Log On in Canada's National Parks

Where: Canada
May 15, 2014 at 10:35 AM | by | Comments (0)

Sharing on social media straight from the great outdoors is about to get that much easier, as Canada has big plans for some connectivity across their national parks.

Canada Parks is the group behind the new idea, as they’re responsible for keeping the signs looking good and taking out the tourist trash across almost 50 national parks and even more historic sites. Now they’re taking steps to improve the outdoor experience—at least in theory—as they’ll be installing WiFi hotspots across plenty of destinations.

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There are So Many Baby Animals at the DC Zoo Right Now

May 8, 2014 at 6:21 PM | by | Comments (0)

Washington DC has now had sunshine without rain for almost 24 hours straight, so that's enough for us to declare that winter is over and the unbearable humidity of summer can begin. As always during the summer months - and we actually flag this transition for you every year - that means we're going to stray from travel politics stories and into the occasional zoo travel roundup. Partly it's because nothing happens in Washington during the summer and we need content. But really it's because, by the time May hits, we just can't take these people any more. If you want to mark the precise moment we broke this year, in fact, here's the exact post from last week about the TSA.

Meanwhile the Smithsonian's National Zoo, which is across the street from Jaunted's DC headquarters, is overflowing with baby animals. So let's talk about them instead, shall we? Videos embedded at the bottom.

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Strip Off the Winter Coat for a Frolick in These California Flower Fields

April 16, 2014 at 10:54 AM | by | Comments (0)

Just the other day we shared a great place to tiptoe through the tulips, and now we’ve got another recommendation on where to check out all the glory that is the spring season. Pack your favorite allergy medicine—we’d recommend at least a Claritin or two—and head to Carlsbad, California, as The Flower Fields at Carlsbad Ranch are now in the business of blooming until May 11.

Not too far north from San Diego sit over fifty acres of blossoms, as Giant Tecolote Ranunculus flowers take over the rolling hills and fields. The Fields are open to the public each and every day of the week and, judging from the picture, it’s well worth the cost of admission. It’ll set you back $12 for the adults in your group, and the kids will be just $6—with those under two scooting in for free. If you like what you see, opt for a season pass that'll set you back $25.

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From Caves to Waves: What to Do on Christmas Island

April 7, 2014 at 1:59 PM | by | Comments (0)

A tiny stamp of land in the Indian Ocean, Christmas Island is a haven for crabs, birds, and, as a territory of Australia, even for asylum-seekers. Why would anyone pay the expensive airfare and trek so far to visit Christmas Island? This is the question we'll be answering all week.

Now that you've reached the island and braved the native crabs, what else should be on your itinerary while spending some time surrounded by ocean? Naturally you'll want some beach time, but there's also snorkeling or scuba diving, nature walks and animal-spotting.

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April's Most Instagrammable Festival is Found in Washington State

April 4, 2014 at 10:52 AM | by | Comments (0)

When it comes to fields of tulips and the scent of spring, your mind may first go to the Netherlands. However, if an international journey isn’t in the cards this time of the year there’s always tulips to be seen here at home in the nifty fifty, as Washington state is pretty good at showing off their green thumb.

The Skagit Tulip Festival runs all month long around Mount Vernon, Washington, but obviously a lot of the blossoms and what not depend on how Mother Nature is feeling. Things are a little bit different than most festivals, as there’s not really just one location or thing to see—you visit to kind of see everything. Drive through the area and the different fields and farms, and enjoy the tulips as they make their debut after a long winter. There’s hundreds of acres of fields and flowers, so we don’t think you’ll be disappointed that there’s no food court.

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Crabs, Crabs Everywhere But Not a One to Eat: Spotting the Christmas Island Locals

April 3, 2014 at 4:40 PM | by | Comments (0)

A tiny stamp of land in the Indian Ocean, Christmas Island is a haven for crabs, birds, and, as a territory of Australia, even for asylum-seekers. Why would anyone pay the expensive airfare and trek so far to visit Christmas Island? This is the question we'll be answering all week.

Yesterday we showed you how to get to the distant tropical paradise of Christmas Island, so it's about time we highlight what's actually worth doing on the island.

Along with rocky shorelines, killer sunrises and sunsets, the island is home to a plethora of exotic animals. The most popular of these, and certainly the most visible, is the red crab, which migrates across the island to spawn and hatch their young once a year. Although the island is completely taken over by the crabs in the Southern Hemisphere's early summer, rest assured spotting the crabs isn't a difficult feat any other time of the year. These little red decapods can be found all over the place, mingling with plenty of other crab varieties, like robber, blue, hermit, little nipper and ghost crabs.

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