Tag: Museum Travel

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Photos: Thousands of Airplanes in the Arizona Desert, at Pima Air and Space Museum

February 19, 2015 at 8:35 PM | by | Comments (0)

Last year, we called the Museu Tam outside Sao Paulo, Brazil the "greatest aviation museum you've never heard of," but what what institution can lay claim to the sister title of the "greatest aviation museum you have heard of?" For that, we go not to the Smithsonian, but to the desert outside Tucson, Arizona, home to Pima Air & Space Museum.

Before you protest to say that you actually haven't heard of it, wait a sec.

Pima has become the final resting place of many a historic airliner, including a NASA "Super Guppy" and the DC-6 which served as Air Force One to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. Pima's massive museum and even more ginormous outdoor exhibition area (over 80 acres!) is a jolly neighbor to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base's 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG), which you'll most likely recognize as the haunting landscape of 2,600 acres full up with retired military aircraft.

The AMARG makes occasional cameos in movies, TV shows, and on curiosity websites, but spends most of its time as a mecca for #AvGeeks from around the world.

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Astronauts at Work are Now on Display at The Air and Space Museum in D.C.

January 12, 2015 at 11:15 AM | by | Comments (0)

Amongst the current attempts to make commercial space travel a reality and on the heels of NASA unveiling its vintage-style space travel posters, the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC opened its own tribute to human travel in space in the form of its new exhibit “Outside the Spacecraft: 50 Years of Extra-Vehicular Activity.” (Also known as EVA which comprises of work done outside the spaceship.)

The timing of the exhibit, which opened last week on January 8th and will run through June 8th, corresponds to the 50th anniversary of the first ventures made by astronauts outside a spacecraft.

Art, artifacts, and photography are used to show how technology, specifically spacesuits, made it possible for humans to exit the ship and explore space as an environment. Visitors will learn how the spacesuit is essentially a “wearable spacecraft,” allowing humans to brave the hazardous elements of space.

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Three US Museums with 'Night at the Museum'-Style Overnights in 2015

December 19, 2014 at 3:26 PM | by | Comment (1)

This weekend, Night At The Museum: Secret of the Tomb hits theaters and, in honor of its release, we have a look at three museums where your kids can spend the night in 2015.

La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles, CA

The Overnight Adventures program at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County now includes the La Brea Tar Pits. Camp Goo at the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits gives children the chance to get down and dirty in the tar pits with special flashlight tours, a scavenger hunt, and sticky crafts. All overnight adventures also include light snacks, a museum patch, and entry into the museum the following day. Check out the full schedule of upcoming camps at nhm.org.

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10 Things We Learned at Berlin's Museum Dedicated to Currywurst

Where: Berlin, Germany
December 17, 2014 at 2:01 PM | by | Comments (0)

Only in Germany will you encounter a museum dedicated to sausage, particularly the famed currywurst. Just steps away from Checkpoint Charlie—you know that famous site that separated East and West Berlin and was often photographed with tanks during the Cold War—is the Deutsches Currywurst Museum.

At the museum, visitors can learn the history about the snack, listen to some famous currywurst tunes, watch a film dedicated to the best of the wurst, play ketchup-bottle whack-a-mole, and even sit on a most phallic of sausage couches—ohne Darm, if you catch our drift. Well, to our surprise, there was a lot to learn about this essential Berliner snack. Here are just some of the basics:

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$75 for the Best Bar Cart Ever at Delta's Surplus Sale

December 8, 2014 at 9:02 AM | by | Comments (0)

So here’s the perfect gift for the frequent flyer in your life, and that’s especially the case if he or she is loyal to the friendly folks over at Delta.

The airline is cleaning out their closets this holiday season, and as a result they’ve noticed that they have a few too many up in the air goodies—specifically in-flight beverage carts. Delta is now offering up these galley carts to the public at a good deal, and they’ll be on sale this Friday, December 12, for just $75 per cart.

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Sydney Harbour Secrets: The Sailing Ship You Can Crew

December 5, 2014 at 4:56 PM | by | Comments (0)

The Opera House, Harbour Bridge, the ferry to Manly…every tourist to Sydney, Australia knows where to go, but Sydney happens to be home to the largest natural harbour in the world. It’s in and amongst those large sites you’ll find the smaller secrets, and we’re sharing a few of our favorites all this week.

Keep going. Beyond the beaches, the islands, the famous bridge, is the district of Darling Harbour and its nautical gem: Australian National Maritime Museum.

As with every museum, there's a building with glassed-in exhibits, explanation plaques, and priceless artifacts; it's outside, at the docks, where the Maritime Museum really shines. You see, there's a submarine docked there. And a destroyer. And a patrol boat or two. And a humongous tall ship that's a full replica of the Endeavor which Captain Cook sailed around Australia and New Zealand in the late 1700s. You're welcome to board them all and have a look around, because the Australian National Maritime Museum is home to some of the best preserved examples of nautical history still in the water, still welcoming the public.

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10 Weird Facts We Learned at Belgium's French Fry Museum

Where: Bruges, Belgium
December 4, 2014 at 11:44 AM | by | Comments (0)

When you think of Belgium, what food comes to mind? Chances are your top three replies are chocolate, beer, and waffles. Add a fourth, however; Belgium is the originator of what we now call the "French Fry."

Bruges/Brugge, a historic town a train ride away from Brussels, is probably most recognized as the location of a Colin Farrell film. But tucked away in one of Brugge’s oldest buildings is an homage to the French fry, one of Belgium's proudest artifacts.

Fry stands in France and Belgium are like hot dog stands in New York City, as in all over the place. The Friet Museum (Vlamingstraat 33) covers the controversial history of this Belgian—not French—delicacy.

So, what did we learn after visiting?

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One of Papua New Guinea's Most Prized Attractions is for the Birds

November 26, 2014 at 9:24 AM | by | Comments (0)

One of Papua New Guinea’s main tourism markets is centered around the beautiful Bird of Paradise, which is only found in PNG and parts of Australia. Its brightly-colored features and dramatic presence draws the international birding crowd to PNG, from organized tours to research and educational focus groups.

Cornell Scientist Edwin Scholes and National Geographic Photographer Tim Laman teamed up to complete the first comprehensive study of the Bird of Paradise, an endeavor that took eight years and 18 expeditions. Along with the scientific data, they brought back a huge collection of photos and videos that capture all 39 known species of the bird. The scientist/photographer combo also documented several new behaviors not previously known to researchers, mainly focusing on the displays of courtship as they relate to the selection of sexual partners and, thus, evolution.

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Throwback Thursday: The First Airline Lounge Opened 75 Years Ago

November 20, 2014 at 12:40 PM | by | Comments (0)

Sure, we love all the speed and comfort of modern travel, but it didn't get that way overnight. Every Thursday, we're going to take a look back at travel the way it used to be, whether that's decades or centuries ago. This is Throwback Thursday, travel edition.

This week we got a little restless and hopped down to Dallas for the day, with the express purpose of wandering around AA's C.R. Smith Museum, about a 10-minute drive from DFW Airport. We'll have more on it later since it is a very worthwhile diversion, but allow us to highlight their small exhibit on the history of airline lounges.

You see, American Airlines originated the ideas of airport lounges way, way back when commercial aviation was still in its infancy. 2014 marks the 75th Anniversary of the Admirals Club, the first of which debuted in December 1939 as the "Flagship Club" at what is now New York's LaGuardia Airport.

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Easy Day Trips from Daytona Beach: The Stetson Mansion in DeLand, FL

November 6, 2014 at 2:08 PM | by | Comments (0)

Located about halfway between Orlando and Daytona Beach lies the city of DeLand. The city was founded in 1876 by Henry Addison DeLand, a wealthy baking soda manufacturer from New York. His friend, John B. Stetson, who made his wealth in hat manufacturing and is the credited inventor of the iconic “cowboy hat,” liked the area so much that he decided to build a house there. This house would serve as the DeLand family’s winter retreat from Philadelphia.

Originally, the house was built on the 300 acres of land that Mr. Stetson owned. Today it sits on only a little over 2 acres so it is hard to imagine what it would have looked like. After John B. Stetson’s death in 1906 the house was eventually sold off and had become a private home to different families throughout the last century, losing some the history along the way.

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Where to See the Famous Pan Am Globe of Juan Trippe

November 4, 2014 at 10:15 AM | by | Comments (0)

The news these last few days has featured much about the boundaries and challenges for the future of travel, and how space is not only important for transportation, but imagination. Altogether it has reminded us of a famous quote from Pan Am's Juan Trippe:

Mass travel by air - made possible in the jet age - may prove to be more significant to world destiny than the atom bomb. For there can be no atom bomb potentially more powerful than the air tourist, charged with curiosity, enthusiasm, and good will, who can roam the four corners of the world, meeting in friendship and understanding the people of other nations and races.

Trippe's office globe, on which he planned Pan Am's route expansion, has been preserved within the Smithsonian's archives. Visitors may see it, along with other Pan Am historical items, in the "America by Air" exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC.

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Chances are You've Never Heard of One of the USA's Most Popular Museums

November 3, 2014 at 10:38 AM | by | Comments (0)

Looking for something to do—how about a visit to a new museum? Dubbed the “mini-Smithsonian”—at least by its founders—the Discovery Park of America sits in rural Tennessee, but apparently visitors have had no problem at all finding it.

Officials over at the museum kind of expected around 150,000 people tops to check things out in the first year. Well, the museum celebrated its first birthday over the weekend, and over 270,000 people have already visited.

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