Tag: Mexico Travel

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Wish You Were Here: Perched High Above Puerto Vallarta

December 9, 2013 at 1:43 PM | by | Comments (0)

Puerto Vallarta sits in the center of the Bahía de Banderas, a 62-mile bay that runs from Punta Mita in the north down south to Cape Corrientes. The view you see from the photo is taken from the southern-most part of Vallarta looking north towards the center of town. In the distance, you can see the coast curve around to the left towards Punta Mita.

Many travelers who visit the area for the first time tend to stay put in Puerto Vallarta proper, but the city's location on the bay means that there are plenty of opportunities for day trips, from small villages such as Mismaloya and Boca de Tomatlan to surf towns like Bucerias and Sayulita.

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How the Road to Hana, Hawaii Re-aligned Our Travel Perspective

November 22, 2013 at 10:24 AM | by | Comments (0)

Our Assistant Editor Will McGough is currently traveling through the Hawaiian Islands, making stops on Kauai, Maui, Hawaii Island and Oahu. Yesterday, we reported that one town on Oahu was hoping to drop off the tourism map. Below, he shares is thoughts on the news from a Kona hotel room.

Aloha from Kona, the land of lava, kava, and coffee. For those of you who have never had kava, a “sedative” drink made from the roots of the plant by the same name, stay tuned. I’m going to be doing my fair share of sampling tonight in anticipation of writing a rundown of it next week.

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Can One Airport Straddle a Border Between Two Countries? Tijuana Thinks It's Possible.

Where: Mexico
September 9, 2013 at 9:37 AM | by | Comments (0)

A new international bridge is just around the corner, as the airport down in Tijuana has a plan to connect arriving passengers right into Mexico or the United States.

The plan—called Gateway to Las Californias—is made up of a 525-foot-long bridge that will connect the city’s A.L. Rodríguez International Airport directly with a US Customs station right on the other side of the border. You’d land in Mexico, get your stuff, and then walk over the bridge and arrive in the United States—assuming your visit with the customs and border protection officers goes well

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Why Veracruz, Mexico Will Have a Place on 'Hot Spot' Lists for 2014

September 3, 2013 at 12:42 PM | by | Comments (2)

Anyone who has actually been to Mexico in the past few years knows the majority of the places are safe, filled with friendly people, and packed with a hell of a lot of culture. But the country sure has a knack for splitting the room down the middle, doesn’t it? There’s incorrect information on safety spread by those who've never visited the country, and those that aren’t afraid to visit are sometimes scared off by the fact that the most prominent destinations in the country, Cancun and Cabo, tend to be a bit touristy.

This Jaunted contributor is doing his best to help with the former—to squash the idea that a trip to Mexico is synonymous with imminent death—but the Internet certainly isn’t doing us any favors. A quick Google search for "Mexico safety" reveals a mess of news articles about kidnappings and murders, but a search for "United States safety" reveals only the websites for U.S. safety commissions. Considering that Baltimore, St. Louis, New Orleans, D.C., Atlanta, Philly, Chicago, Cleveland, and Miami all have higher murder rates than Mexico City and Mexico on a whole, the results of the search seem...strange?

New Orleans has the highest murder rate in the States and more than triple that of Mexico, yet a million or so people go to Mardi Gras every year. Go figure.

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AeroMexico Says '¡Hola!' to Their First Boeing 787 Dreamliner

Where: Mexico
August 19, 2013 at 12:24 PM | by | Comment (1)

After far too many months of Instagram posts that aren't very exciting, AeroMexico has begun to use the photography social media site to brag about their newest bird. In fact, the Mexican airline is not only snapping pics of a 787 Dreamliner of which they've just taken delivery, but are letting the cameras roll with some 'Instavids', and we can't be happier.

A few weeks ago, the airline began getting its followers excited with a countdown to the delivery date of the new Boeing aircraft, using the hashtag, #AMBoeing787. A week before AeroMexico took the keys to their (big) baby, their account was active with a few videos. A cool one showed off the 787 getting painted in time-lapse, while another offered a peek at it pulling out of the hangar and taking to the skies.

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Spirit Airlines and the Case of the Anthony Weiner Dick Joke

August 2, 2013 at 6:06 PM | by | Comment (1)

Spirit Airlines recently posted an ad about the ongoing fiasco that is the Anthony Weiner New York mayoral campaign. They did this, first, because they're tactless tasteless douchebags and, second, because they're tactless tasteless douchebags.

Just to be clear. We don't object to the Internet's inherent and inalienable right to make fun of Weiner or his campaign. Gawking at political trainwrecks is why Al Gore invented the Internet in the first place (that's a fact; you can look it up). And it's not like this is even the most tasteless Spirit ad specifically about marital infidelity. This one was probably worse.

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Barbie Has a Passport, a Fact Which is Actually Causing Controversy

April 26, 2013 at 1:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

She's been a veterinarian, an Olympic gymnast, a marine biologist, an 80s rock star, a mermaid and the president (many times over). She's Barbie, and her range is even unencumbered by nationality. The newest Barbies are additions to the classic "Dolls of the World" collection, and one in particular is causing quite the uproar.

A "Mexico Barbie," complete with a traditional Mexican dress and a pet chihuahua, has a passport has an accessory. Yikes.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Taking On Teotihuacan

March 22, 2013 at 3:03 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza are probably the two most famous pre-Hispanic historic sites within easy tourist reach in Mexico. While Chichen Itza is over on the Yucatan Peninsula and more accessible via Cancun, Teotihuacan is just north of Mexico City and therefore perfect for a day trip. You can rent a car and/or hire a driver to get you there, but there are also several reputable tour companies that can do the trick for you.

Wayak Tours, which operates out of the Mundo Joven Catedral hostel just off of the Zocalo, is a good one. In addition to Teotihuacan, they’ll take you to Tenochtitlan as well as the Basilica de Guadalupe, where the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared to the Spanish.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Get Lost in Chapultepec

March 21, 2013 at 12:02 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Mexico City has an embarrassment of riches. The city’s just so grande and so full of museums, ruins, churches, and the like that even tackling one neighborhood at a time may not be enough. Chapultepec Park, which spans almost 1,700 acres, is the largest city park in the Western hemisphere. You can easily spend a whole day in and around this e, which is reason enough to give yourself more than just a few days in Mexico City.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: On the Canals of Xochimilco

March 20, 2013 at 11:32 AM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Mexico City is dotted with UNESCO World Heritage Sites, but we want to talk about Xochimilco, one of the last remaining remnants from when Mexico City was an island. This district of canals is a popular place for locals to hang out on weekends and, naturally, the way to see the canals of Xochimilco is by boat.

The traditional small, brightly colored boats of Xochimilco all bear the names of women (Brenda, Rosita, Carolina) and can be rented by the hour. Adding to the female-friendly vibe is the fact that women are traditionally given rose corsages when they board. While on the water, other boats glide by and hawk their wares, selling everything from spicy corn on the cob to silver jewelry to beer and soda. If you’re interested, simply signal and the boat will attach itself to yours long enough for the purchase to be finalized.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: From Zona Rosa to Roma

March 19, 2013 at 11:21 AM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Zona Rosa isn’t the neighborhood most representative of Mexico City, but it’s safe and a great place to be a tourist. This upscale area is convenient from the airport (you can get there for about 200 pesos, or less than $20, by taxi) and has all the basics a visitor needs: pharmacies, ATMs, and stuff that’s open late.

Though Zona Rosa deservedly gets the rep of being all foreign restaurants and overpriced internet cafes, there’s also some excellent scenery nearby. El Angel de la Independencia (Angel of Independence) is a large, beautiful sculpture located in a traffic circle on the busy Paseo de la Reforma. On weekends, it’s not unusual for ice cream vendors to set up shop near El Angel or for marathon runners to pass by on their morning route. If you ever get lost, El Angel is such a recognizable landmark that almost anyone in Mexico City will be able to point you in the right direction. Also nearby is the statue of Diana the Huntress, who is said to be pointing her arrow “toward infinity.”

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Zocalo A-Go-Go

March 18, 2013 at 4:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

If you only have one day to spend in Mexico City, spend it in the center of town, where there’s the best concentration of activities. The big main square is technically named Plaza de la Constitucion, but it’s been called the "Zócalo" for so long that locals will scratch their heads and wonder what the heck you’re talking about if you use the formal name.

Zócalo means “base,” and it's all kind of a joke. A former president planned to build a huge monument in the square, but only got around to finishing the base. The name stuck, and now Zócalo is also the name of the metro station serving the area.

First off, check out the Palacio Nacional, or National Palace, which used to be the residence for the presidents of Mexico. Now, however, it’s a free museum, and the real highlight is the collection of Diego Rivera works adorning most of the building. Be sure to scope out the giant mural, a triptych which covers major events in Mexican history, from the days of the Aztecs to the arrival of the Spanish and beyond. (Frida Kahlo’s also in there somewhere, if you can spot her.)

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