Tag: Island Travel

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What Everyone's Buying on Christmas Island: Cheap Liquor and Special Stamps

April 8, 2014 at 1:36 PM | by | Comments (0)

Welcome to "What Everyone's Buying," a new series on souvenirs, wherein we investigate what tourist trinkets are the hottest selling in hotspots around the world.

As you may have already gathered from our previous posts, Christmas Island has a good lot to offer when it comes to nature, beaches, diving, and endemic species. When it comes to souvenirs, however, the island runs a bit dry unless you're looking for crab toys, crab t-shirts or books about crabs. So the majority of visitors, both long- and short-term, opt to head to the island's supermarket and its duty-free liquor variety.

The selection is excellent, including even "traveler edition" flavors of Absolut, and prices are half that of mainland Australia, so wine and liquor is a huge score for those wanting to imbibe without breaking the bank.

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From Caves to Waves: What to Do on Christmas Island

April 7, 2014 at 1:59 PM | by | Comments (0)

A tiny stamp of land in the Indian Ocean, Christmas Island is a haven for crabs, birds, and, as a territory of Australia, even for asylum-seekers. Why would anyone pay the expensive airfare and trek so far to visit Christmas Island? This is the question we'll be answering all week.

Now that you've reached the island and braved the native crabs, what else should be on your itinerary while spending some time surrounded by ocean? Naturally you'll want some beach time, but there's also snorkeling or scuba diving, nature walks and animal-spotting.

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Crabs, Crabs Everywhere But Not a One to Eat: Spotting the Christmas Island Locals

April 3, 2014 at 4:40 PM | by | Comments (0)

A tiny stamp of land in the Indian Ocean, Christmas Island is a haven for crabs, birds, and, as a territory of Australia, even for asylum-seekers. Why would anyone pay the expensive airfare and trek so far to visit Christmas Island? This is the question we'll be answering all week.

Yesterday we showed you how to get to the distant tropical paradise of Christmas Island, so it's about time we highlight what's actually worth doing on the island.

Along with rocky shorelines, killer sunrises and sunsets, the island is home to a plethora of exotic animals. The most popular of these, and certainly the most visible, is the red crab, which migrates across the island to spawn and hatch their young once a year. Although the island is completely taken over by the crabs in the Southern Hemisphere's early summer, rest assured spotting the crabs isn't a difficult feat any other time of the year. These little red decapods can be found all over the place, mingling with plenty of other crab varieties, like robber, blue, hermit, little nipper and ghost crabs.

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How to Get Last-Minute Tickets to the St. Croix Food and Wine Experience

April 3, 2014 at 2:28 PM | by | Comments (0)

The 2014 St. Croix Food & Wine Experience is only a few days away but there are still tickets left for some of the festival's best events.

This year’s theme, Culinary Futures, emphasizes the St. Croix Food and Wine Experience and A Taste of St. Croix’s commitment to the community, to culinary industry, and to nurturing the exceptional talent of St. Croix's youth.

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How to Travel to Christmas Island, Australia's Indian Ocean Oasis

April 2, 2014 at 12:59 PM | by | Comments (0)

A tiny stamp of land in the Indian Ocean, Christmas Island is a haven for crabs, birds, and, as a territory of Australia, even for asylum-seekers. Why would anyone pay the expensive airfare and trek so far to visit Christmas Island? This is the question we'll be answering all week.

Even though Christmas Island is a legal bit of Australia, it's actually a 4-hour flight out and nearer to Indonesia. The population is a mix of Aussies, Chinese, Malaysians and more, all peacefully coexisting amongst nature on this hunk of extinct volcano, 63% of which is protected national park land. Most widely known for its annual red crab migration (November or December), the island does offer a variety of natural wonders and endemic species to warrant such a once-in-a-lifetime trip.

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What's the Difference Between the Three Cayman Islands?

March 31, 2014 at 12:46 PM | by | Comments (0)

It is said that Christopher Columbus first referred to the Cayman Islands as "Las Tortugas" due to the large population of sea turtles living in the area. The current name also comes from Columbus, who used the Carib word for marine crocodiles, caiman, to describe the large population of rock iguanas that call the islands home.

Today, the three islands are under British control and rely on tourism for a large portion of their economy. Although they are separated by only 90 miles at their maximum distance and all known as scuba diving destinations, the islands maintain pretty distinct personalities, and the correct one for you depends on the type of trip you hope to have. Below, we break down the main differences between Grand Cayman, Little Cayman, and Cayman Brac.

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The Tastiest Exotic Fruits to Try in the Southern Hemisphere

March 19, 2014 at 2:02 PM | by | Comments (2)

Apples and orange and pears, oh my! More like oh boy, as these fruits are only the tip of the iceberg for tastiness, and travelers to the Southern Hemisphere know this well.

Exotic fruits on the other side of the world are a serious attraction for the culinary adventurer, and we're not talking about dragonfruit, lychee or papaya; instead we're looking further afield to what can be found beyond the Equator:

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Wish You Were Here: A Not-So-Secret Secret Island in Sydney Harbour

March 19, 2014 at 11:37 AM | by | Comments (0)

Ask any Sydney tourist where to go for the best views of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House, and they’ll most likely recommend a trip on the Manly Ferry, which departs from Circular Quay near the base of the bridge. It’s a bit like Sydney’s version of the Staten Island Ferry in that it’s packed with both commuters and tourists, and it tirelessly plies the Harbour’s waves day in and day out.

While the Manly Ferry is certainly a great idea, we’ve got a better one: Fort Denison.

You see, Sydney Harbour is the largest natural harbor in the world. As such, it’s going to have a few surprises like islands and forts, or, in this case, a combination of the two.

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Five More Awesome Things about the Caribbean Island of Saba

March 5, 2014 at 12:05 PM | by | Comments (0)

We told you about the lack of beaches, the memorable airport, and the pristine, world-class diving, but there’s much more to love about Saba once you scratch the surface and go beyond the headlines. Here are five more awesome things we discovered that helps to define life on this tiny Caribbean island:

You Can Hitchhike Without Worry

If you walk down the road outside the main drags of town, you probably won’t even need to stick out your thumb – locals will most likely pull over and ask if you need a ride. During our trip, we met a Canadian who told us a great story about arriving to Saba and hitchhiking to his first day of work. He found himself in the back of a truck, sitting on the metal floor next to a goat, the animal sliding against him in the moving vehicle. When the driver asked where he was going and what he did on the island, the man said he laughed out loud before responding, his hand on the goat to keep it at bay, “I’m a doctor. I’m going to the med school.”

A doctor might be a respected and prestigious position in North America, but no one is above riding in the back of a pickup with the local wildlife on Saba.

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Nonstop Flights to the Grenadines on the Way Thanks to New Airport

Where: St. Vincent and the Grenadines
March 4, 2014 at 1:26 PM | by | Comments (0)

Later this year, the Grenadines will become more accessible for Americans as the first international airport opens on St. Vincent. The chain of 32 Caribbean islands will then offer non-stop flights from North America for the first time.

Set to open in late 2014, the new Argyle International Airport will replace the existing ET Joshua Airport and will offer direct international jet service from the U.S., Canada and Europe. The project broke ground in 2008 and cost $240 million, which is the country’s most expensive capital project in its history and nearly one half of its GDP. How’s that for a sign of commitment to tourism growth?

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Mailbag: 'What's Up with Metal Bands and White Paint on Palm Trees?'

March 4, 2014 at 11:54 AM | by | Comments (0)

Have questions you want answered? Write us, or hit us up on Twitter or Facebook.

Anywhere you find palm trees, you're bound to see a metal band or white paint on the trunks. The sight bugged the hell out of us in the beginning, and it continues to haunt travelers today: Why do they do that to the trees?

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Monday, Five Thirty: This Caymanian Rum is Aged Underwater

March 3, 2014 at 5:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

In celebration of the most needed happy hour of the week, we're launching a new column called “Monday, Five Thirty” that will take a look at different vices from around the world, specifically boozes and beers unique to a destination. Last week, it was Killepitsch in Dusseldorf, and now, we head to Grand Cayman to try out some of the local rum, Seven Fathoms, which is aged underwater.

Rum that hails from the Caribbean is far from breaking news, but we feature this particular brand for the unique way in which it is aged - seven fathoms, or 42 feet, under the sea off the coast of Grand Cayman. The idea definitely sounds a bit wacky on the surface, but once you dive in, it seems to make sense in theory.

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