Tag: Island Travel

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 4: A History Lesson Before Turning Homeward

Where: Australia
October 9, 2014 at 3:56 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

The islands and miles stacked up in our rearview as we left Vanuatu, with a flight plan that took us north to the Solomon Islands, initially to Guadalcanal and Honiara and then onto the New Georgia group.

The longest single flight of our trip so far would be five hours between Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu and Honiara, Solomon Islands, but the winds were on our side and, soon enough, emerald green mountains surrounded by white sandy beaches and coral reefs welcomed us to yet another island destination: Guadalcanal.

We descended through the foothills of the mountains to reach the northern shore and landed at Henderson Field, the second World War II-historic air field of our trip (the first being Santo).

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Travel Movie Tuesday: Just Can't Wash 'South Pacific' Out of Our Hair

October 7, 2014 at 11:30 AM | by | Comments (0)

From Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck falling in love in Rome to Julia Roberts circling the globe to find herself, film has played an important role in shaping both the golden years and current day of travel. Thus, we present our newest series, Travel Movie Tuesday, where we detail the most inspiring travel films.

Even though the 1958 musical, "South Pacific", is centered around fictional events on an island in the middle of the Pacific during World War II, the technicolor hues and catchy melodies will quickly send you daydreaming about discovering your own slice of shade under a palm tree.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 3: Where the 'South Pacific' Sky Meets the Sea

Where: Vanuatu
September 24, 2014 at 3:52 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

After arriving late at night into Noumea, New Caledonia following several days of flying, it was time to rest. The setting for this respite would be Ille Des Pins, a coral cay about 80 miles to the southeast of Noumea. As idyllic as it sounds, we had quite a large challenge to overcome when it came to actually flying there, one we had not imagined we would encounter and for which we had not prepared.

You see, the air traffic tower there speaks only French—view the landing plate to see what we mean. Luckily enough, I was able to scrape enough schoolboy-level French from the back of my mind (combined with some words remembered from cabin announcements on Air France, like piste equating to "runway").

By no means was our conversation with ATC smooth, but we were able to communicate well enough, whilst understanding both the tower and other aircraft on frequency. After the stress of getting the plane on the ground, we couldn't have appreciated the calm paradise of Ille des Pins more.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 2: Past the Point of No Return

September 2, 2014 at 2:17 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

It's not very often a private pilot leaves an entire continent behind for open skies but, on our first day on this Pacific trip, that's exactly what we did. The mainland of Australia slowly slipped off the back of our map, and we had our first taste of the adventure of isolation.

Lord Howe Island would be the next stop. This piece of Oz is a small volcanic remnant about 600 KM to the east of Port Macquarie, Australia. There are only 347 permanent residents on the island and tourist numbers are capped at 400 at any given time. Our initial plan was to transit through Lord Howe and continue onto Norfolk Island the same day after a quick refueling.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 1: Planning to Fly the South Pacific

Where: Australia
August 27, 2014 at 12:31 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

It is often a dream of private aviators to not only slip the surly bonds of gravity, but also those of their home country and try flying abroad. As my good friend/flight instructor Nick Pech and I readied my Cirrus SR20 for what we simply dubbed "The Pacific Trip," the complex preparations smoothed the way for what would be pure bliss, under our own power over the clouds.

Passports? Affirm. Over two weeks, our routing would take us from Bankstown Airport in Sydney, to Australia's Gold Coast, and then out over open water over to Lord Howe Island, continuing on to Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and then back to Australia, entering at Cairns.

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Fraser Island Field Trip: Offroading Inland to Secret Creeks and Special Lakes

July 24, 2014 at 10:35 PM | by | Comments (0)

We may have stayed close to the shore yesterday, but now it's time to brave the sand dune tracks and head inland on Australia's Fraser Island. While it's rated as the largest sand island in the world, Fraser is shockingly easy to traverse if you've got the right gear, and we're not just talking low gear. A 4x4 is all you need to reach those corners of the island both so untouched and pristine, you'll think you're the first to ever view them.

It's important to note that there are a handful of lakes on the island worth the trek away from the beaches. Lake McKenize is the most famous, with its crystal blue waters ringed with white sand. McKenzie, Lake Birrabeen and Basin Lake are all perched lakes that depend on rainfall to fill their shores, so the waters are cool and fresh, and begging you to swim. Let's talk about a few of the other inland sites, however:

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Perfect the Art of Doing Nothing on Turks and Caicos

June 11, 2014 at 11:35 AM | by | Comments (0)

View from Ocean Club Resort on Grace Bay

We've already told you about the unusual ingredient in the cocktails at the best beach bar on Provo in Turks and Caicos, and we'll show you what to eat when you're on the island in this week's Street Food Friday.

But other than eating and drinking, we don't have much advice on what to do.

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Wish You Were Here: Posting Up at One of the World's Best Beach Bars

June 3, 2014 at 11:57 AM | by | Comments (0)

The British-owned Turks and Caicos island chain is known for its lack of development and shallow coastal waters, the latter of which greatly contributes to the scenery with its turquoise shine (if you're not familiar with what makes the Caribbean water so blue, learn here).

This week and next, we'll give you a rundown of tourism on the island chain, including what to see and do and how the individual islands are different from one another. We'll also spill the peas and rice on what to eat and drink and where to hang out. Specifically, we'll give you directions to one of the world's best beach bars, found on Providenciales (Provo). The photo you see above is a snapshot from our happy hour yesterday. Yes, we do indeed love our research.

Stay tuned for the scoop, and wish you were here!

[Photo: Will McGough]

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The Tiny Island of Montserrat Has a Big Plan for Tourism Development

June 2, 2014 at 11:03 AM | by | Comments (0)

View from the Blackwood Allen hiking trail

Montserrat, a British Territory located in the Lesser Antilles, was hit hard in the late-80s and mid-90s by a hurricane and a volcanic eruption that left the island in a state of disarray. Tourists stopped coming, and the locals were left to pick up the pieces and rebuild. Now, almost two decades later, the 70 square-mile Montserrat is ready to get back on the tourism map.

In a recent public relations release, the island put out a wide call for investors and presented a variety of opportunities for consideration, from hotel projects and residences to property within the capital town and marina. Montserrat has set up a website where potential investors can learn more about what's available and the current state of the island.

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Lesser Known Islands of the USA: San Juan Islands, WA

May 23, 2014 at 3:56 PM | by | Comments (0)

According to the calendar we’re just days away from the start of the summer season, and that means it’s time to turn our attention towards some great warm weather destinations. So get out on the water, wave goodbye to the mainland, and set you watch to island time.

What Are The San Juan Islands?

They might not be that lesser known to those in the know over in the Pacific Northwest, but if you asked some one on the other side of the country—there’s a likelihood they’d mumble something about the time they went to Puerto Rico. The San Juan Islands are off the coast of Washington, as they do the archipelago thing between there and British Columbia.

How To Get There

There’s many islands doing their thing within the chain, but only four are readily available to you thanks to little ferry fun. The Washington State Department of Transportation is all over it, and they’ll take you to spots like Lopez Island, Orcas Island, and Shaw Island—among some other spots. Head over here for the full schedule and rundown, and note that fares are going to depend on your destination and what not. The trip starts at around $13 per passenger between Anacortes and Friday Harbor, but just be aware that fares are not collected in the opposite direction.

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Lesser Known Islands of the USA: Catalina Island, CA

May 22, 2014 at 1:47 PM | by | Comments (0)

According to the calendar we’re just days away from the start of the summer season, and that means it’s time to turn our attention towards some great warm weather destinations. So get out on the water, wave goodbye to the mainland, and set you watch to island time.

What’s Catalina Island?

You’ve been to Southern California and visited its tourist attractions, must-sees, and hidden gems; however, we would have to guess that you have not made you way out to Santa Catalina Island. Known just as Catalina Island or Catalina to its friends, the spot does its thing as part of Los Angeles County roughly 22 miles off the coast from Los Angeles itself. It belongs to a larger chain of islands, and they’re all part of one big happy family—the Channel Islands. Some estimates put visitors at close to a million per year, so it’s probably one of the more well known of our lesser known islands.

How To Get There

Paddling a kayak isn’t going to be an option here, and the car is going to need to stay back on the mainland. Ferry service is available from a couple spots along the California coast, but it seems like the major route heads back and forth between Avalon—on the island—and San Pedro. Catalina Express is responsible here, and they also have options from Long Beach and Dana Point. Rates start at around $80 per adult including some mandatory wharf charges, but plan to add a few more bucks if bringing your bike or surfboard.

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Lesser Known Islands of the USA: Bald Head Island, NC

May 21, 2014 at 7:26 PM | by | Comments (0)

According to the calendar we’re just days away from the start of the summer season, and that means it’s time to turn our attention towards some great warm weather destinations. So get out on the water, wave goodbye to the mainland, and set you watch to island time.

What’s Bald Head Island?

Situated off the coast of North Carolina, Bald Head Island does its thing as a vacation wonderland. The business and industry is based on you coming to visit, so hurry up and head down for a trip. It might not have the charm of a seasonal seaside village, but what it does have is the attention to detail of what most are looking for when it comes to rest and relaxation. Thanks to past storms the island is no longer truly an island by some definitions, but you're going to need to get there by boat. So we say it counts.

How To Get There

Those coming in to North Carolina should probably make their way to Wilmington, and then from there it’s about 90 minutes to where you’re going to pick up the ferry. Travel by boat only takes 20 minutes, and it will set you back around $25 per adult for a round-trip fare. Things depart out of Deep Point Marina in Southport, and ferries leave the mainland on the hour and from the island on the half hour. No need to worry about the rates for taking your car, as that’s not an option—we’ll get to that in a minute.

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