Tag: Island Travel

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This Deserted Caribbean Beach is Aruba's Secret Site for Plane Spotting

December 17, 2014 at 3:48 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's paradise, pure and simple. A deserted beach of white sand gently melting into clear, azure water. The waves are mere ripples, the water is of that desired "bathwater" warmth, and airplanes whizz directly overhead in the sunny sky. Welcome to one of the best, most undiscovered plane spotting locations in the Caribbean: Renaissance Island, Aruba.

It's no St. Maarten Maho Beach, but the experience will appeal to dedicated plane spotters who prize unique locations and a range of aircraft for indulging their hobby. Even sunbathers should make the easy nature walk from the Renaissance Island's developed beaches down a path to this spot, which we discovered this month while on a trip to the Southern Caribbean.

Pack your swimsuit, camera, mosquito repellant, sunscreen, and footwear a little more substantial than flip flops, and let's go...

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Buy Steve Martin's Island Home for the Luxury, Stay for the Runway Views

December 15, 2014 at 3:05 PM | by | Comments (0)

With the holidays approaching, Saint-Barthélemy is about to become a hotbed of celebrity activity, with one exception. St. Barth regular Steve Martin will likely be vacationing somewhere else this winter.

The funny man listed his island home, Villa Au Soleil, for the second time in two years (his first try was last summer, but he was also open to $28,000 per week rentals.

The asking price is $9,015,012 and you'll find the house located in the hills of the exclusive Lurin neighborhood. Inside is a gourmet kitchen, formal dining room, a large living room with a media area, multiple terraces, and en suite bathrooms off of each bedroom.

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In Search of Perfect Weather: When to Travel to Aruba

December 10, 2014 at 4:45 PM | by | Comments (0)

Google Aruba's average weather and you'll quickly learn two things:

1. Aruba is pretty much an ideal 84 degrees every day, year round.

2. Aruba lies outside the Caribbean hurricane belt.

Both of those statements are music to the years of travelers in the mood for "anywhere sunny, with a beach," but there are reasons outside the weather why you may or may not want to head down to "One Happy Island."

To make sure you book that dream trip and have the best possible time, we've got some recommendations for when to go to Aruba.

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Sydney Harbour Secrets: The Perfect Picnic Oasis of Shark Island

December 3, 2014 at 4:21 PM | by | Comments (0)

The Opera House, Harbour Bridge, the ferry to Manly…every tourist to Sydney, Australia knows where to go, but Sydney happens to be home to the largest natural harbour in the world. It’s in and amongst those large sites you’ll find the smaller secrets, and we’re sharing a few of our favorites all this week.

It’s pretty, as a garden island covered in palm trees, fresh-cut grass, wild tropical blooms would be, but it’s Shark Island’s location and serenity that truly makes this patch of only 3.7 acres something special in Sydney. By the way...there are no sharks; the island is so named due it's shape.

Shark Island has no buildings other than an open-air, Queen Anne-style picnic pavilion at its highest point and a few other scattered picnic alcoves. This betrays Shark Island’s chief activity; there’s nothing much else to do than lay on the beach or gaze out to the sailboat traffic of nearby Rose Bay.

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Sydney Harbour Secrets: The 1 O'Clock Shot at Fort Denison

December 1, 2014 at 3:40 PM | by | Comments (0)

The Opera House, Harbour Bridge, the ferry to Manly…every tourist to Sydney, Australia knows where to go, but Sydney happens to be home to the largest natural harbour in the world. It’s in and amongst those large sites you’ll find the smaller secrets, and we’re sharing a few of our favorites all this week.

Fun fact: Sydney Harbour is itself a giant park. Some 970 acres of waterways, islands, shores, beaches, and historic sites make up the Sydney Harbour National Park, and there’s no one better place to begin exploring it than Fort Denison, a tiny island which claims much less space than even one of those acres.

Known as "Mat-te-wan-ye” to the Aboriginals and “Pinchgut Island” to the military who arrived with the First Fleet in 1788, Fort Denison only earned its Fort title after 1862 and the establishment of a tower and sandstone fortifications. These days it’s home to a small maritime museum and restaurant, not to mention a traditional 1pm cannon firing to help mariners keep correct timing.

So why should you go?

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The Quirimbas Archipelago: How Do You Even Reach This Private Island Paradise?

October 22, 2014 at 1:31 PM | by | Comments (0)

Have you ever seen a photo of a destination and thought, "I HAVE TO GO TO THERE?" Sure you have, because who hasn't? It's as base a desire as having a taste for a different cuisine for dinner.

This morning we were afflicted with a serious case of wanderlust, after reading on HotelChatter of the newest private island resort, Anantara Medjumbe Island Resort & Spa:

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 4: A History Lesson Before Turning Homeward

Where: Australia
October 9, 2014 at 3:56 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

The islands and miles stacked up in our rearview as we left Vanuatu, with a flight plan that took us north to the Solomon Islands, initially to Guadalcanal and Honiara and then onto the New Georgia group.

The longest single flight of our trip so far would be five hours between Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu and Honiara, Solomon Islands, but the winds were on our side and, soon enough, emerald green mountains surrounded by white sandy beaches and coral reefs welcomed us to yet another island destination: Guadalcanal.

We descended through the foothills of the mountains to reach the northern shore and landed at Henderson Field, the second World War II-historic air field of our trip (the first being Santo).

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Travel Movie Tuesday: Just Can't Wash 'South Pacific' Out of Our Hair

October 7, 2014 at 11:30 AM | by | Comments (0)

From Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck falling in love in Rome to Julia Roberts circling the globe to find herself, film has played an important role in shaping both the golden years and current day of travel. Thus, we present our newest series, Travel Movie Tuesday, where we detail the most inspiring travel films.

Even though the 1958 musical, "South Pacific", is centered around fictional events on an island in the middle of the Pacific during World War II, the technicolor hues and catchy melodies will quickly send you daydreaming about discovering your own slice of shade under a palm tree.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 3: Where the 'South Pacific' Sky Meets the Sea

Where: Vanuatu
September 24, 2014 at 3:52 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

After arriving late at night into Noumea, New Caledonia following several days of flying, it was time to rest. The setting for this respite would be Ille Des Pins, a coral cay about 80 miles to the southeast of Noumea. As idyllic as it sounds, we had quite a large challenge to overcome when it came to actually flying there, one we had not imagined we would encounter and for which we had not prepared.

You see, the air traffic tower there speaks only French—view the landing plate to see what we mean. Luckily enough, I was able to scrape enough schoolboy-level French from the back of my mind (combined with some words remembered from cabin announcements on Air France, like piste equating to "runway").

By no means was our conversation with ATC smooth, but we were able to communicate well enough, whilst understanding both the tower and other aircraft on frequency. After the stress of getting the plane on the ground, we couldn't have appreciated the calm paradise of Ille des Pins more.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 2: Past the Point of No Return

September 2, 2014 at 2:17 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

It's not very often a private pilot leaves an entire continent behind for open skies but, on our first day on this Pacific trip, that's exactly what we did. The mainland of Australia slowly slipped off the back of our map, and we had our first taste of the adventure of isolation.

Lord Howe Island would be the next stop. This piece of Oz is a small volcanic remnant about 600 KM to the east of Port Macquarie, Australia. There are only 347 permanent residents on the island and tourist numbers are capped at 400 at any given time. Our initial plan was to transit through Lord Howe and continue onto Norfolk Island the same day after a quick refueling.

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Six Islands in a Single-Engine, Part 1: Planning to Fly the South Pacific

Where: Australia
August 27, 2014 at 12:31 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's the stuff of headlines, when a pilot ventures away from familiar runways to embark on an epic aviation adventure in a single-engine aircraft, and it's exactly what Jaunted contributor Joe Corrigan is doing. Follow along over the next several days, as Joe shares trials, triumphs, and terrific images from flying to remote corners of the South Pacific.

Island Hopping in a Single-Engine, The Series:

1. Flight Planning
2. The Point of No Return
3. On Island Time
4. Home Again, Jiggety-Jig

It is often a dream of private aviators to not only slip the surly bonds of gravity, but also those of their home country and try flying abroad. As my good friend/flight instructor Nick Pech and I readied my Cirrus SR20 for what we simply dubbed "The Pacific Trip," the complex preparations smoothed the way for what would be pure bliss, under our own power over the clouds.

Passports? Affirm. Over two weeks, our routing would take us from Bankstown Airport in Sydney, to Australia's Gold Coast, and then out over open water over to Lord Howe Island, continuing on to Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and then back to Australia, entering at Cairns.

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Fraser Island Field Trip: Offroading Inland to Secret Creeks and Special Lakes

July 24, 2014 at 10:35 PM | by | Comments (0)

We may have stayed close to the shore yesterday, but now it's time to brave the sand dune tracks and head inland on Australia's Fraser Island. While it's rated as the largest sand island in the world, Fraser is shockingly easy to traverse if you've got the right gear, and we're not just talking low gear. A 4x4 is all you need to reach those corners of the island both so untouched and pristine, you'll think you're the first to ever view them.

It's important to note that there are a handful of lakes on the island worth the trek away from the beaches. Lake McKenize is the most famous, with its crystal blue waters ringed with white sand. McKenzie, Lake Birrabeen and Basin Lake are all perched lakes that depend on rainfall to fill their shores, so the waters are cool and fresh, and begging you to swim. Let's talk about a few of the other inland sites, however:

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