Tag: Historical Travel

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Bathing in Bath: Check Out These Amazing New Options at Thermae Bath Spa

Where: Hot Bath Street, Bath, United Kingdom, BA1 1SJ
May 21, 2015 at 4:00 PM | by | Comments (0)

We’re open to a debate about this, but we think most people trek to Bath to see the (admittedly impressive) Roman Baths. But if you’re one who prefers to take the waters instead of merely see the waters, Thermae Bath Spa might be for you.

The Spa is actually not one big building but a combination of five restored buildings and one new build that uses the façade of a listed townhouse clad in Bath stone. This main building – the newbie – is the New Royal Bath and it is all glass and LED lighting, full of curves and cubes that complement the architecture of the original buildings. This is the spot where you’ll primarily check in, change, soak and sweat. There’s also a laid-back café here.

New Royal Bath Minerva Pool

After you’ve changed and psyched yourself up to be seen in public roaming around in a bathing suit, you have a decision to face: Do you head first to the Minerva Pool – a large temperate-temperature swimming pool with whirlpools and a lazy river feature; the four kitted-out Aroma Steam Rooms in varying degrees of degrees and with a huge fiber-optic-lit rainfall shower that mists and then storms; or the open-air Rooftop Pool (pictured at page top) that looks out over Bath whether it’s day or dusk? Tough call.

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Watch World War 2 Airplanes Fly Over Washington D.C. This Friday

May 5, 2015 at 4:00 PM | by | Comments (0)

May 8, 1945: V-E Day. The Allies officially celebrate the end of World War 2 with the acceptance of the surrender of Nazi Germany and the Axis powers. For the first time in years, airplanes flying overhead meant only celebration and the return of good times instead of loss and potential tragedy.

May 8, 2015: The 70th Anniversary of V-E Day. The airplanes flying overheard on this day will again celebrate the victory of the allies, and some of the aircraft will be the very same which flew those 70 years ago.

Washington D.C. will be the site of the United States' grand 70th anniversary celebration of V-E Day this Friday, and Smithsonian's Air & Space Museum reports that the highlight will be a flyover of one of the country's largest private collections of World War 2-era aircraft.

The Smithsonian Air & Space Museum is the chief sponsor, and has a bunch of extras for those who both will and won't be there to watch the display. From the Smithsonian:

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Where to Begin in Cartagena, Colombia: The Best Special Occasion Restaurants

November 26, 2014 at 1:15 PM | by | Comments (0)

Cartagena's so hot right now. New flight routes and a fresh focus on safer tourism in Colombia means more international visitors are arriving to this city of colonial charm and coastal allure. This week we're exploring how to reach and enjoy this city, nicknamed "Door of the Americas."

Street food? Cartagena's got it. Casual lunches on alfresco cafe terraces? Oh yes. Both of these eating options you can arrive at with a quick stroll in the walled central city, but for a special occasion the decision is much more difficult.

Cartagena, home to specialties like lionfish, arroz de coco, and all sorts of seafood ceviche, dresses up these dishes at a few formal restaurants best suited to romantic evenings and taking yourself out for a treat at the end of a successful vacation. Here are three of our favorites:

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Where to Begin in Cartagena, Colombia: Tourist Sites for First-Timers

November 25, 2014 at 1:45 PM | by | Comments (0)

Cartagena's so hot right now. New flight routes and a fresh focus on safer tourism in Colombia means more international visitors are arriving to this city of colonial charm and coastal allure. This week we're exploring how to reach and enjoy this city, nicknamed "Door of the Americas."

So you've arrived, perhaps on the new nonstop JetBlue flights. Now what? Cartagena de Indias is a fortified city, first established in 1533 but with a rich prehistoric and pre-Columbian period, with more than a few attractions for those interested in history, architecture, and Caribbean or South American culture and food.

What to do first? It's okay to put the beach on hold. There are two sites within the city we recommend for a starter taste of Cartagena:

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Throwback Thursday: The First Airline Lounge Opened 75 Years Ago

November 20, 2014 at 12:40 PM | by | Comments (0)

Sure, we love all the speed and comfort of modern travel, but it didn't get that way overnight. Every Thursday, we're going to take a look back at travel the way it used to be, whether that's decades or centuries ago. This is Throwback Thursday, travel edition.

This week we got a little restless and hopped down to Dallas for the day, with the express purpose of wandering around AA's C.R. Smith Museum, about a 10-minute drive from DFW Airport. We'll have more on it later since it is a very worthwhile diversion, but allow us to highlight their small exhibit on the history of airline lounges.

You see, American Airlines originated the ideas of airport lounges way, way back when commercial aviation was still in its infancy. 2014 marks the 75th Anniversary of the Admirals Club, the first of which debuted in December 1939 as the "Flagship Club" at what is now New York's LaGuardia Airport.

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Step Back in Time to 1970s East Germany at These 5 Berlin Spots

November 11, 2014 at 10:22 AM | by | Comments (0)

Brandenburg Gate. Alexanderplatz. Checkpoint Charlie.

The 25th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall has done more than just shed a brighter light on some of Berlin's best-known tourist sites; it's wholly reignited interest in the brief history of the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik), aka East Germany. Although the DDR technically ceased to exist upon Berlin reunification in 1990 and East Germany feverishly adapted to Western fashion and culture, the particular details of DDR everyday life continue to fascinate.

A handful of Berlin sites continue to preserve DDR design, and anyone is welcome to visit. Here are five of our favorites:

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The Sphinx Reopens to Visitors After Four Years of Viewing from Afar

Where: Egypt
November 11, 2014 at 9:06 AM | by | Comments (0)

After four years of renovations, one of Egypt’s iconic attractions, The Sphinx, is ready to be reopened to the public.

The courtyard of the Sphinx, which allows visitors to walk around the statue, was closed so that cracks could be repaired, mainly on the left side of the statue and on the chest and neck. Visitors could obviously still see the Sphinx from a distance, but they weren’t able to get close during the repairs.

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Photos: Inside the Reopened Delta Flight Museum at Atlanta Airport

October 30, 2014 at 8:21 PM | by | Comments (0)


Above: the Delta DC-3

2014 has been a huge, huuuuuge year for airline anniversaries, and at the top of the list is Delta's 85th Anniversary of passenger service, which they celebrated with a reopening of their aviation museum at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

Why a re-opening? Well, as it goes with museums, sometimes exhibits need polishing and the Delta Flight Museum had originally opened back in 1995. It's so much more than spit-shining some cases, however; an entire new aircraft was waiting to be added to the permanent collection.

Now visitors can finally get up close with the Boeing 767 "Spirit of Delta," which was actually purchased by donations totaling $30 million from Delta employees. This plane almost single-handedly allowed Delta to weather the tough economic times of the early 1980s and begin modernizing their fleet. She flew for 23 years and is now half time capsule, half museum-within-in-a-museum, and completely open for visitors to tour.

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Halloween Around the World: The 6 Spookiest Cemeteries with Strange Histories

October 20, 2014 at 1:04 PM | by | Comments (0)

For every enchanting mountaintop resort, riveting extreme sports adventure or breathtaking spa in the middle of nowhere that we write about, there are many places and experiences in this world that we would absolutely NOT use our vacation time (or work time) to explore.

For instance, we don't recommend wingsuit diving into an active volcano on the ice cap of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. Just not a good idea.

We have, however, come to realize that, sometimes people are morbid and weird and sometimes those people like to travel. Following up on our creepiest haunted prisons and asylums tour, we now have a handful of cemeteries that you have to be incredibly unstable brave to visit.

Psst...you might want to keep the lights on for this.

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There's a New Reason to Revisit Alcatraz This Winter

October 14, 2014 at 4:22 PM | by | Comments (0)

If you've been to San Francisco before, you've probably taken a trip out to Alcatraz, one of the world's most infamous golden cages. If the beautiful city views and deep history aren't enough to bring you back for a second visit, the fact that the prison has been taken over by an art exhibit may entice.

At the end of September, a Chinese artist - who is coincidentally under house arrest at the moment - launched a seven-installation exhibit called "@Large: Ai Weiwei at Alcatraz." The installations are found throughout Alcatraz and carry a theme of "protest songs." The most attention-getting exhibit has arguably been one called Trace, which features 176 portraits made of Lego bricks, each presenting "an individual who has been imprisoned or exiled because of his or her beliefs, actions, or affiliations."

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The Little Things: How Condor Airlines Remembers Retro Style

October 7, 2014 at 1:50 PM | by | Comments (0)

In the midst of the bustle of travel, it's all too easy to overlook the details. We're talking about special touches others have stressed over just so you can enjoy a unique experience, whether you know it or not. Every so often we'll highlight The Little Things like this, so now you will know.

All too often these days, airline passengers moan that the the glamor has gone from travel. While it's true that legroom is decreasing and a full, complimentary steak dinner is no longer the norm onboard, the Frankfurt-based leisure airline Condor refuses to let every smidgeon of retro style and comfort be lost to the ages. In fact, Condor slips historical hints of the jet age into each of their flights today.

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This Former Leper Colony on Molokai is the Prettiest Prison We've Ever Seen

October 1, 2014 at 11:50 AM | by | Comments (0)

What I’m about to tell you might be hard to believe: The photo you see above is of a prison. Not a view from a prison, but a prison in itself. I’m sure you’re confused. Let me explain.

In 1865, King Kamehameha V and the Hawaii Board of Health created the “Act to Prevent the Spread of Leprosy” in an attempt to do just that: Control the highly-contagious disease that seemed poised to become nothing short of a major epidemic on the islands. The plan was simple: Take everyone who was infected and quarantine them off from the rest of society. A remote location called the Kalaupapa Peninsula (KA-LOU-PAPA), shown in the photos of this post, was chosen as the location. Sporting the highest sea cliffs in the world and rough seas off shore, it was the obvious choice at the northern end of the lightly-populated island of Molokai.

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