Tag: FAA

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Fire at Chicago FAA Facility Grounds Flights, Worsens Friday Travel Mayhem

September 26, 2014 at 10:49 AM | by | Comments (0)

Update: 12pm EST Flights into and out of Chicago are resuming at a "reduced rate." It has been stated that the fire which caused today's interruption was deliberately set, but was not an act of terrorism. It was set by a man found with self-inflicted wounds, in the basement of the facility.

Early this morning, smoke began billowing out of an FAA facility in Aurora, IL. The fire, whose cause remains suspicious, nonetheless made an impact on US air travel as all flights set to travel into or out of Chicago's O'Hare and Midway Airports were delayed or cancelled, along with many others simply set to fly through the Chicago control area. As of 10am EST, FlightStats.com was reporting upwards of 400 cancelled and 300 delayed flights for the airports.

As expected, lines within the airports stretched along with phone wait times for further information. One gate at O'Hare was reported to quote "30 minutes or 3 hours" for the delay, which demonstrates the uncertainties at the time.

If you're scheduled to fly anywhere in the United States today, please check with your airline (we'd recommend via their official Twitter account or website, with posted alerts) before heading to the airport. As always, be sure to embark on travels today with fully-charged electronics, packed snacks, and some flexibility and patience for the tens of thousands of other stuck in a similar position or worse.

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Flight Attendants Absolutely Do Not Want In-Flight Cell Phone Use Legalized

September 25, 2014 at 9:29 AM | by | Comments (0)

Less than a year ago, the FCC floated the idea of allowing cell phone use in-flight, a movement that most, including us, think would be a terrible, terrible decision. This week, the Association of Flight Attendants, an organization that represents about 60,000 flight attendants working across 19 carriers, confirmed that it too thinks allowing passengers to use cell phones in midair would be absolutely insane.

Here's an update on the situation: This week, a bipartisan group of 77 House Representatives sent a letter to the Department of Transportation, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the Federal Communications Commission that expressed their concerns over the safety and security issues in-flight cell phone use would bring up.

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The FAA Crash That Shut Down Southern California Could Have Been Much Worse

May 13, 2014 at 4:47 PM | by | Comments (0)

Sorry. We know that we're beating this thing into the ground, but it's one of those travel news things that begins as an off-beat story and evolves into a bona fide airplane security firestorm. Of course we're seeing more and more of those stories, but this one is kind of special. Without giving away any details, the most recent Reuters expose includes the phrase "the same vulnerability could have been used by an attacker in a deliberate shut-down," where the thing getting "shut down" was a part of America's air traffic control system. There's a reason people are still talking about this incident.

Just to catch folks up. Two weeks ago something caused the FAA to issue a ground stop across four airports across the greater Los Angeles area, including at LAX, for about an hour. Reporters asked the agency to explain the order, and got more or less nowhere. Another way of describing that move: the FAA shut down most of Southern California's airspace and declined to explain why. Later journalists found out that the military was flying a U-2 spy plane in the area, and that its flight plan caused the FAA's flight tracking server to crash. Cue the batshit crazy conspiracy theorists, who declared that alien signals from the U-2 had beamed autism-filled vaccines into their kids (or something; we didn't read very closely).

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The Convoluted Tale of a US Spy Plane and an FAA Ground Stop

May 6, 2014 at 6:32 PM | by | Comments (0)

When last we left off, the FAA had just gotten over imposing a ground stop on four Southern California airports - LAX, Burbank, Ontario, and John Wayne - because of unnamed "technical issues." Or maybe it was because of mysterious "computer issues." Or maybe because of "the system" that managed the airspace for a particular air traffic control center. The agency wasn't exactly being helpful or clear on why they decided to ground, delay, or divert hundreds of flights. That frustrated at least one local outlet to the point where they kind of snarked that the FAA was sending journalists to functionally useless websites.

We'll remind you that a ground stop is a big deal. It's not just that planes get frozen on the runway at whatever airport gets slapped with the stop. It's that any plane anywhere in the country bound for the ground-stopped airport also gets grounded. These things cascade very, very quickly.

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This Wasn't Exactly a Banner Week for the FAA and TSA

May 1, 2014 at 4:46 PM | by | Comments (0)

What is it about the various government agencies charged with overseeing American travel, do you think, and how they're gratingly bad at what they do? We assume there are parts of the federal government where bureaucrats get things done roughly as well (or not) as they would if they were working anywhere else. But hot damn, do the FAA and TSA screw things up occasionally.

The FAA is an agency that is - literally and metaphorically - standing in the way of the future. It's not just that it took them two years to even draft a policy on in-flight electronics, to the point where the FCC had to initiate a formal procedure to ask them what the hell was taking so long. These are people who are so incompetent that they might end up delaying futuristic private spaceflight just because, hey, they're not sure what they think about all that yet. But at least they keep the planes in the air, right?

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'The Onion' Knows Airline News Better Than...the News

March 7, 2014 at 6:41 PM | by | Comments (0)

TGIF. In honor of it being Friday evening, we're throwing some credit over to the fine folks at The Onion, America's finest satirical periodical. The paper may have discontinued many of its city print editions, but the web version surges on unabated. In fact, in the last week or so, they've posted two fabulously hilarious articles on airlines and, though both are (of course) fake, they make for an excellent read:

· FAA Considering Passenger Ban

· American Airlines To Phase Out Complimentary Cabin Pressurization

And now for some oldie-but-goodies:

· FAA Report: Spirit Airlines Is The Fucking Worst

· Airline Part Of Something Called 'Star Alliance'

· Air Force One Pilot Invites Excited Obama Into Cockpit

[Photo: jasonEscapist]

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Wow. FAA Paperwork Delays May Block Virgin Galactic Debut.

January 30, 2014 at 12:20 PM | by | Comments (0)

Fearless prediction: this is going to get solved before it becomes a problem. There are too many famous people involved, there is too much money at stake, and the optics would be catastrophic. Can you imagine how this would play out in the media? "Washington DC has become so inefficient that it's blocking actual real life we're-living-in-the-future space tourism."

Federal agencies can be cumbersome and individual bureacrats can be petty. But if the FAA actually jams up the launch of a Virgin Galactic space jet - which people say might actually happen - we can finally and safely assume that literally nobody is in charge of anything any more. Seriously. It would look so horrible that we don't understand how anyone is even allowed to go on the record saying it's a possibility.

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Only Good News for Travelers Looking to Keep Gadgets On During Flights

December 20, 2013 at 10:14 AM | by | Comments (0)

Nearly two months after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a directive allowing air travelers to use personal electronic devices (PEDs) from gate-to-gate, the rest of the world is finally beginning to follow along.

British Airways yesterday became the first international airline to declare gadgets safe for use throughout entire flights, even during take-off and landings, and without the wait for the airplane to reach 10,000 feet.

This is not something the airline has just up and done on its own; BA secured clearance for the change from the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) after passing safety tests. Expect more such news from European airlines in 2014, as the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is next to relax gadget rules on flights.

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FAA In-Flight Gadget Update: Two More Airlines Power On 'Airplane Mode'

November 25, 2013 at 8:34 AM | by | Comments (0)


Virgin America testing for FAA gadget approval

"PED" is quickly becoming the acronym of the year. It was only the beginning of this month that the Federal Aviation Administration began approving the use of personal electronic devices at all stages of a flight (yes, even under 10,000'), and already almost all the big US airlines are green for go.

As a quick reminder, the airlines already approved to tell their passengers to keep the PEDs on are: JetBlue, American, American Eagle, Delta, United, US Airways, and Alaska Airlines.

Now there's two more to add the growing list:

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FCC Floats Idea of Ruining Air Travel Forever with In-Flight Cell Phone Calling

November 22, 2013 at 4:48 PM | by | Comments (0)

America's Founding Fathers, in their wisdom, created a system of government with multiple checks and balances. The idea was to prevent populist excesses and to slow down change, just in case lawmakers got carried away with a seemingly good idea and accidentally - in their own zeal - made the world a worse place to live. This is what they were talking about.

It took literally two years for the FAA to move from thinking about letting travelers use electronics gate-to-gate, to writing a proposal letting travelers use electronics gate-to-gate, to actually letting travelers use electronics gate-to-gate. This was not exactly a rush across the finish line, in other words.

But now that there's some momentum, apparently the federal government - this time the FCC - thinks that everything involving flying and electronics should be up for grabs. Yesterday the agency floated the idea of letting passengers use cell phones above 10,000 feet.

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FAA In-Flight Gadget Update: What Airlines Have the Thumbs Up to Keep the Power On

November 11, 2013 at 5:22 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's been nearly two weeks since the Federal Aviation Administration issued a directive allowing air travelers to use personal electronic devices (PEDs) from gate-to-gate, without the wait for the airplane to reach 10,000 feet. Already there's a photo contest and funny flight attendant story, but the freedom is limited to airlines with FAA approval.

The new directive went into effect on November 1, and airlines have been quick to send in their applications. Before keeping that smartphone/tablet/camera switched on, know if you're even allowed to by checking out which airlines even have the go-ahead from the FAA:

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Take a Look at the First Flight with FAA-Approved Personal Gadget Use

November 2, 2013 at 1:09 AM | by | Comments (0)

Happy Friday indeed, as today marks the first time air travelers may use personal electronic devices (PEDs) from gate-to-gate, without the wait for the airplane to reach 10,000 feet. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) passed down the new directive yesterday, but held off on issuing airlines final approval until this afternoon when JetBlue and Delta got the sign-off on required testing to keep devices switched on.

According to ABC News:

Delta said on Thursday that all of its aircrafts had completed the "carrier-defined PED tolerance testing" needed to ensure that the electronic device frequencies didn't interfere with the aircraft. JetBlue said the same today, noting that all of its 191 planes had passed inspection.

These preparations have paid off for the airlines, as JetBlue and Delta came into a photo finish to the be the first airline approved under the new FAA directive. Other domestic airlines have either submitted for approval or are in the process of it, with the goal of Thanksgiving. Of course, flight attendants may just look the other way.

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