mexico city Travel Guide

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Taking On Teotihuacan

March 22, 2013 at 3:03 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Teotihuacan and Chichen Itza are probably the two most famous pre-Hispanic historic sites within easy tourist reach in Mexico. While Chichen Itza is over on the Yucatan Peninsula and more accessible via Cancun, Teotihuacan is just north of Mexico City and therefore perfect for a day trip. You can rent a car and/or hire a driver to get you there, but there are also several reputable tour companies that can do the trick for you.

Wayak Tours, which operates out of the Mundo Joven Catedral hostel just off of the Zocalo, is a good one. In addition to Teotihuacan, they’ll take you to Tenochtitlan as well as the Basilica de Guadalupe, where the Virgin Mary was said to have appeared to the Spanish.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Get Lost in Chapultepec

March 21, 2013 at 12:02 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Mexico City has an embarrassment of riches. The city’s just so grande and so full of museums, ruins, churches, and the like that even tackling one neighborhood at a time may not be enough. Chapultepec Park, which spans almost 1,700 acres, is the largest city park in the Western hemisphere. You can easily spend a whole day in and around this e, which is reason enough to give yourself more than just a few days in Mexico City.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: On the Canals of Xochimilco

March 20, 2013 at 11:32 AM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Mexico City is dotted with UNESCO World Heritage Sites, but we want to talk about Xochimilco, one of the last remaining remnants from when Mexico City was an island. This district of canals is a popular place for locals to hang out on weekends and, naturally, the way to see the canals of Xochimilco is by boat.

The traditional small, brightly colored boats of Xochimilco all bear the names of women (Brenda, Rosita, Carolina) and can be rented by the hour. Adding to the female-friendly vibe is the fact that women are traditionally given rose corsages when they board. While on the water, other boats glide by and hawk their wares, selling everything from spicy corn on the cob to silver jewelry to beer and soda. If you’re interested, simply signal and the boat will attach itself to yours long enough for the purchase to be finalized.

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: From Zona Rosa to Roma

March 19, 2013 at 11:21 AM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

Zona Rosa isn’t the neighborhood most representative of Mexico City, but it’s safe and a great place to be a tourist. This upscale area is convenient from the airport (you can get there for about 200 pesos, or less than $20, by taxi) and has all the basics a visitor needs: pharmacies, ATMs, and stuff that’s open late.

Though Zona Rosa deservedly gets the rep of being all foreign restaurants and overpriced internet cafes, there’s also some excellent scenery nearby. El Angel de la Independencia (Angel of Independence) is a large, beautiful sculpture located in a traffic circle on the busy Paseo de la Reforma. On weekends, it’s not unusual for ice cream vendors to set up shop near El Angel or for marathon runners to pass by on their morning route. If you ever get lost, El Angel is such a recognizable landmark that almost anyone in Mexico City will be able to point you in the right direction. Also nearby is the statue of Diana the Huntress, who is said to be pointing her arrow “toward infinity.”

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A First-Timer's Guide to Mexico City: Zocalo A-Go-Go

March 18, 2013 at 4:33 PM | by | Comments (0)

We don't hear too much about Mexico City these days, even though it's a totally doable flight and an easy trip from most major US Cities. So this week we're changing that, and clueing you in to the must-dos for a first timer's trip to La Ciudad de los Palacios (The City of Palaces), AKA Mexico City.

If you only have one day to spend in Mexico City, spend it in the center of town, where there’s the best concentration of activities. The big main square is technically named Plaza de la Constitucion, but it’s been called the "Zócalo" for so long that locals will scratch their heads and wonder what the heck you’re talking about if you use the formal name.

Zócalo means “base,” and it's all kind of a joke. A former president planned to build a huge monument in the square, but only got around to finishing the base. The name stuck, and now Zócalo is also the name of the metro station serving the area.

First off, check out the Palacio Nacional, or National Palace, which used to be the residence for the presidents of Mexico. Now, however, it’s a free museum, and the real highlight is the collection of Diego Rivera works adorning most of the building. Be sure to scope out the giant mural, a triptych which covers major events in Mexican history, from the days of the Aztecs to the arrival of the Spanish and beyond. (Frida Kahlo’s also in there somewhere, if you can spot her.)

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How To Get Tickets To Visit Frida Kahlo's Wardrobe in Mexico City

January 16, 2013 at 12:14 PM | by | Comments (0)

The flamboyant artist Frida Kahlo knew there was no better runway than the runway of life and that was evident in her over-the-top style. For the first time in almost 60 years, the public can now view the extravagant wardrobe of Kahlo in Mexico City.

The exhibit, named "Appearances Can Be Deceiving," is housed in her former home-turned-museum in the Del Carmen area of the city, and it features about 300 items from her personal wardrobe. Everything from dresses and headpieces to jewelery and her famed corsetry are all on exhibit to honor the unique life of the artist.

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How Not to Be 'An Idiot Abroad' in Mexico

February 14, 2011 at 4:25 PM | by | Comments (0)

Though Karl Pilkington might not be the best tour guide for practical international travel, he did have one important revelation to share on this week's episode of An Idiot Abroad - they don't actually have Mexican Jumping Beans in Mexico.

As part of his quest to see all seven wonders of the world, Karl visited the Mayan site Chichen Itza which includes the Kukulkan Pyramid, also known as the castle, and is considered one of the world's seven wonders. The temple was used for human sacrifice is surrounded by several other structures, including rows of ancient pillars which Karl refers to as "an Ikea for columns."

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Uploading Drunken Spring Break Pics From the Airport Will Cost You

March 23, 2009 at 12:55 PM | by | Comments (0)

Mexico City managed to be left off the State Department's recent warning on travel to Mexico -- not because spring breakers are less likely to go there than Cancun or Cozumel, but because the outbreak of violence in the country has been concentrated further north. But the city is seeing plenty of through traffic as North Americans head to sunny destinations further south.

Japanese Tom Hanks Hiroshi Nohara liked Benito Juarez International Airport so much he lived there for almost half a year. But he must not have been checking his e-mail there -- at the price of $0.50 a minute through Telmex, he would have run out of funds long before being able to Priceline a ticket home. Sorry, those pics of you and your friends doing shots of tequila may not get uploaded to Facebook until after you've arrived home.

Reading your RSS feeds on spring break? Tell us where you picked up the signal.

Related Stories:
· Mexico Travel Alert [Travel.state.gov]
· Airport Lover Hiroshi Nohara Headed Home [Jaunted]
· Airport WiFi Map [Jaunted]

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Airport Lover Hiroshi Nohara Headed Home

January 13, 2009 at 9:05 AM | by | Comments (0)

Japanese Tom Hanks Hiroshi Nohara is headed home, after spending 117 days in Mexico City International Airport and then shacking up with a mysterious woman known only as Oyuki for close to two weeks.

Nohara reappeared at MEX on Sunday, carrying three plastic bags full of clothes and blankets. His flight back to Japan left Monday, with a stop scheduled for San Francisco.

While Nohara never fully explained why he was living in the airport, we like to think that he was part of some Illuminati super-plot or was at least wrapped up in some kind of real-life Bourne scenario. 'Cause really... "The Terminal"? Honestly, it wasn't that good.

Related Stories:
· Man Returns to Japan after Mexico Airport Stay [AP, via Google]
· Japanese Tom Hanks Moving On Up [Jaunted]
· Japanese Tom Hanks Can't Get Enough Of Mexico City [Jaunted]

[Photo: China Daily]

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Chewing Gum Overwhelming Mexico City's Sidewalks

January 9, 2009 at 11:30 AM | by | Comment (1)

The sidewalks of Mexico City are being overwhelmed by gum, spit out and ground into the pavement to the tune of 70 pieces every three feet. So the city's point man in keeping public spaces clean, Ricardo Jaral, has a message for those of you who would toss your flavorless chew in the street:

When you finish chewing a piece of gum, you either have to put in a piece of paper and deposit it in a trash receptacle, or swallow it.

Isn't that bad for you? Jaral says nope:

I've always swallowed my gum, and it's never done me any harm.

At least you'll still be allowed to pop a piece on a whim: While you're now allowed to chew in Singapore, you can only get so-called therapeutic gum from pharmacies after showing ID.

Related Stories:
· Mexico Tells Citizens to Swallow Their Gum [MSNBC, via]
· Mexico City Will Eat Cake, 22,000 Pounds Of It [Jaunted]
· World's Largest Ice Rink Now Open In Mexico [Jaunted]

[Photo: laughingmonk]

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Mexico City Will Eat Cake, 22,000 Pounds Of It

January 6, 2009 at 3:30 PM | by | Comments (0)

Happy Three Kings Day! Spanish-speaking countries all over the world celebrate the appearance of the Magi at the manger today, and nowhere is the party bigger than in Mexico City, which baked an 22,000-pound cake for the event.

The Rosca de Reyes, a sweet bread studded with candied fruit, measures nearly a mile long and contains 1,400 plastic babies akin to those found in King Cakes for Mardi Gras. (But you don't want to find this baby because then you have to throw a party for all your friends on February 2.)

Catch up with the festivities in Mexico City now by heading down the Paseo de la Reforma to the Monumento a la Revolución, a Porfirio Diaz-era structure where the Tres Reyes party moved in 2005 from the Parque Alameda Central. The parade, a relatively new addition to the celebration (dating back to just 2007) looks a lot like the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, except for the dudes on camel-, elephant- and horseback. They're the kings of course.

Related Stories:
· Massive 11-Tonne Bread Readied for Traditional Mexico Party [AFP, via Yahoo!]
· Three Kings Ride Through Mexico City for First Time [EFE]
· Mexico City Travel coverage [Jaunted]

[Photo: Remi.B]

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Anthony Bourdain Finds "Ryan Seacrest's Love Juices" In Mexico

January 6, 2009 at 9:34 AM | by | Comments (3)

Five seasons into "No Reservations" and Anthony Bourdain is running a little low on far-flung locales to eat his way though, so it's no surprise that this season starts in not-all-that-exotic Mexico City.

But Bourdain promises to show us that Mexico is about more than just tacos, tortas and quesadillas, and then proceeds to, well, eat a hell of a lot of tacos, tortas and quesadillas. Of course his are filled with tongue, tripe, brains and eyeballs, so what the ep lacks in imagination it more than makes up for in offal.

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