Santiago Travel Guide

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Street Food Friday: The Perfect Chilean Lunch

Where: Santiago, Chile
September 5, 2014 at 12:51 PM | by | Comments (0)

Homemade Pastel de Choclo

When visiting the center of Santiago, a walk through the Mercado Central or La Vega is a must for foodies looking to discover the local scene. Always chatty and full of color, these markets carry a lot of personality and plenty of opportunities to munch along the way. But if you want to discover the traditional dishes that Chileans chow down on when they go out for a casual meal, be sure to make the rounds to the local restaurants and order these favorites:

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What It's Like to Fly for 10 Hours on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner

Where: Santiago, Chile
January 14, 2013 at 12:05 PM | by | Comments (0)

It flies! It actually flies!

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a headline hog. You can read all about it and its drama (lately more than ever) throughout major media, but there's nothing better than actually stepping onboard with a ticket to ride.

After more than a year of hanging out with the 787 on the tarmac, we finally flew the darned thing as South American airline LAN celebrated the inaugural flight of their new Los Angeles-to-Santiago, Chile 10-hour non-stop with the spiffy new bird.

So, what actually happens onboard a 787 flight? Is it really so different from any other airplane? Having just stepped off of this, our first 787 flight, we can finally answer those questions: lots of stuff and yes.

To describe a 10-hour flight is akin to boring neighbors with photo slides of a water park vacation. Instead, we're breaking it down into the hourly highlights ("the short of it") and, for those rapt with pleasure for every detail, the long of it, in first-person:

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How to Say '787 Dreamliner' in Spanish

Where: Santiago, Chile
January 7, 2013 at 5:24 PM | by | Comments (0)

How do you say "787?" Seven-eight-seven or seven-eighty-seven? Though technically both are perfectly acceptable, the language may vary depending on the country to/from which you're flying the new airplane. And, since United is the only US operator of the airlines with Boeing 787 Dreamliners, the international names for the bird are more prevalent.

Before we set off on last week's LAN inaugural flight from LAX-SCL on their newest Dreamliner, @PointstoPointB tweeted us to ask: "how do they call the plane in Spanish onboard? Siete Ocho Siete? Siete Ochenta y Siete? El Sueñoliner?"

Well, dearest @PointstoPointB and future flyers of the LAN Dreamliner, we cleared up the issue firsthand with LAN's flight attendants. Their answer:

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Foreign Grocery Friday: The Hallulla Bread of Chile

Where: Santiago, Chile
January 4, 2013 at 11:51 AM | by | Comments (0)

When we travel, one of our favorite things to do is to pop into a local grocery store and check out the food products and candies we'd never find anywhere else. So we're trying out this new feature, Foreign Grocery Friday, where each week we'll feature some of our (and your) favorite overseas treats. Got a recommendation? Let us know!

Warning: Celiacs, Atkins Dieters and carb haters look away now!

Hallulla. It's so close to "hallelujah" and coincidentally that's exactly how we feel upon finding the round, flat breads of this name in Chilean grocery stores. Chileans love bread, and there's typically no shortage of fresh baked varieties for the taking. Still our heart goes out to Hallulla (actually pronounced "ah ew yeh") for its satisfying taste and reliability.

Got a couple coins in your pocket and a rumbling stomach? Hallulla is there for you. Got a few paper bills in your wallet? Pick up some ham and cheese slices to complete what is nearly a staple in the Chilean diet.

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The 2012 Destination of the Year is...

Where: Santiago, Chile
December 31, 2012 at 5:15 PM | by | Comments (0)

It's that time of the year again, the time when the year just plain ends. Alas, we can't just let 2012 go that easily, especially since travelers spent it both up in the air and up in arms over a crazy range of topics. Needless to say, we're ready for 2013, but first we're taking a brief look back at the best of 2012 with the Jaunted Travel Awards,—or as we fondly refer to them—The Jauntys.

Every year at this time we're forced to look back on our travels to choose one place, just one place, we loved so much that it gets our highest recommendation. Last year, that honor fell to Bangkok, Thailand. For 2012, we're hopping to another continent across the world to declare Santiago, Chile as 2012's Destination of the Year.

Why? Well, there's the usual stats we could list, like how it's been ranked the safest city in South America and how it's a hotspot for creative and tech companies expanding their international offices, but it's really as simple as this: the city is freaking awesome and we enjoyed every little bit so much that we went twice in 2012 on our own, spending some weeks there to get a good feel for the place.

And any country that offers helicopter bungee jumping above a volcano...we want to go to there.

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Wine Tasting Without Leaving the City, at Santiago's Viña Aquitania

Where: Avenida Consistorial 5090, Santiago, Chile
September 26, 2012 at 5:17 PM | by | Comments (0)

In honor of #winewednesday, and partly because we're really feelin' the Chile lately, today we visit a winery within Santiago's city limits (believe it or not).

Viña Aquitania sits in the Maipo Valley, but is still very much a part of the city even if the presence of the towering Andes in the background suggests you're way out in some nearly untouched swatch of nature. It's not a humongous winery, nor is it teensy-weensy. It's just right for an hour-long visit with a tour and tasting, and even accessible via public transportation (subway to a bus).

We headed out here with Santiago Adventures for a super-brief taste of what they typically offer in full-day form; that is, entire excursions to visit multiple wineries plus activities, for the wine-serious. It is spring in Chile just now, so the vines weren't anything near their greenest, but the tours continue.

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The Three Best Neighborhoods in Santiago for Scoping Out Street Art

Where: Santiago, Chile
September 25, 2012 at 2:03 PM | by | Comments (0)

We've said it before and now we've just got to say it again: Santiago, Chile is a revelation for fans of street art. The city is just...spectacular. You've got to see it.

Santiago is divided up into quarters and, within them, neighborhoods (barrios). Here we're focusing on these barrios because, if you go to Santiago and ask a local to point you to one of the quarters, then you're going to be met with a quizzical look for such a broad question; it's a bit like asking how to get to lower Manhattan, when you should specify Tribeca.

· Barrio Bellavista: Where you'll find us! Bellavista is within the Providencia quarter, but sat right at the bottom of the Cerro San Cristobal mountain. From the Mapocho River, walk straight up the street Pio Nono to pass a slew of outdoor restaurants and an excellent churros truck, plus the outdoor Patio Bellavista mall-like complex.

It's a bohemian quarter thanks to the presence of the large Universidad San Sebastian and the University of Chile Law School. Pio Nono ends at the hill, with the city's Zoo and a funicular railway and hiking path, but turning off onto any street (Dardignac is especially good) will yield tons of street art.

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Foreign Grocery Friday: The Mote con Huesillos of Chile

Where: Santiago, Chile
September 14, 2012 at 2:07 PM | by | Comments (0)

When we travel, one of our favorite things to do is to pop into a local grocery store and check out the food products and candies we'd never find anywhere else. So we're trying out this new feature, Foreign Grocery Friday, where each week we'll feature some of our (and your) favorite overseas treats. Got a recommendation? Let us know!

While the northern hemisphere is unpacking the down vests and preparing to layer for the winter, the southern hemisphere is stripping for the quickly warming temps of spring. Down in Chile, this means the arrival of the Mote con Huesillos vendors, streetcarts which shovel cooked wheat (mote) into a cup, add dried peaches (huesillos) and pour a cold peach-sugar-cinnamon liquid to fill it to the brim.

It's good. It's real good, and it's cheaper (not to mention healthier) than buying a Coca-Cola.

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The Adventures of Travel Cat: Palacio La Alhambra in Santiago, Chile

Where: Santiago, Chile
September 12, 2012 at 1:47 PM | by | Comments (0)

Kitty cats. They rule the internet and, whether we realize it or not, pretty much the world too. Ever noticed how cats sometimes stake out the coolest spots in a city? This new feature—Travel Cat—focuses on exactly that. Submit a photo to be featured by tweeting or Instagramming it to us (details below).

Travel Cat spotted in: the Palacio La Alhambra in Santiago, Chile.

This week's Travel Cat is from me, your intrepid editor here at Jaunted. I just happen to be in Santiago, Chile right now—part of a trip using award miles that'll take me on to Easter Island today. Nonetheless, I always find the time to see a city and, hopefully, spot a few local cats chillin in the sun.

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Inside LAN's Engine Shop at Their Santiago Airport Maintenance Base

Where: Santiago, Chile
April 13, 2012 at 10:03 AM | by | Comments (0)

General Electric. Pratt & Whitney. Rolls Royce. Sound familiar? Sure, as appliances and cars, maybe, but these companies are also very much into the business of manufacturing airplane engines. And just like when airplanes go into a hangar for maintenance, so too do their engines have a special work area.

Welcome to the Engine Shop for LAN Airlines, located right nearby Santiago, Chile's Comodoro Arturo Merino Benítez International Airport.

It's really odd to stand in a room so clean it's almost sterile, and be surrounded by machines that not only cost something like $13 million each, but are responsible for hundreds or thousands of lives every day, each again. You know, we could walk into Harry Winston on Fifth Avenue and look at velvet-lined trays of jewelry worth just as much and more, but the pendants and tiaras don't do anything. Next to an engine, however, we were left with a profound sense that here, right here, is a real machine, something worth every raw cent spent on it and every cent (sometimes $3 million) spent to keep it in tiptop condition.

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iPads in the Cockpit: Apple's Slick Video Shows Off United's New Toys

Where: Santiago, Chile
April 5, 2012 at 1:28 PM | by | Comments (0)

This has truly been the week for tablet hype. You can't do business without them, can't educate without them and apparently can't even watch tv without them.

While flying certainly can still be done without an iPad, the little gadget is seriously making life easier for the thousands of pilots already given them to aid in navigation and flight planning. We know that American Airlines and British Airways are passing out the pads, but it's United who has partnered up with Apple to show exactly how the whole aviation + mobile tech thing works.

The beautiful video:

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Foreign Grocery Friday: The Alfajors of South America

Where: Santiago, Chile
March 23, 2012 at 11:59 AM | by | Comment (1)

When we travel, one of our favorite things to do is to pop into a local grocery store and check out the food products and candies we'd never find anywhere else. So we're trying out this new feature, Foreign Grocery Friday, where each week we'll feature some of our (and your) favorite overseas treats. Got a recommendation? Let us know!

Spend any time longer than a layover in Argentina or Chile or Peru (or name most any South American country) and you're bound to nibble on an Alfajor or two.

Alfajors are small, sweet sandwiches of a sort, made of two crackers with dulce de leche between, and white or milk chocolate covering it all. Trust Wikipedia to come through with the facts: "Argentina is today the world's largest consumer of Alfajors" and they've been "popular since the mid 19th century." Hey—what works for South America also works for us.

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